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Open AccessArticle

The Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Biochemical Markers in Beijing Adolescents

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Beijing Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Beijing100013, China
2
Beijing Research Center for Preventive Medicine, Beijing 100013, China
3
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Xicheng District, Beijing 100013, China
4
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Fangshan District, Beijing 100013, China
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, No.101 Longmian Ave, Jiangning District, Nanjing 211166, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4557; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224557
Received: 9 October 2019 / Revised: 8 November 2019 / Accepted: 11 November 2019 / Published: 18 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Children's Health)
Objective: To describe the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in adolescents and its association with several MetS-related biochemical markers. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was carried out and data were extracted from the Nutrition and Health Surveillance in Primary and Secondary school students of Beijing (NHSPSB) 2017. Participants were aged 10–15 years old. MetS was diagnosed using the recommended criteria for Chinese adolescents. The associations among MetS, biochemical biomarkers, and socioeconomic status were estimated by multivariable linear regression. Results: The prevalence of MetS in adolescents in Beijing was 3% in the total sample, 4% in boys, and 2% in girls. Moreover, the prevalence of MetS in the overweight and obesity populations were 5% and 12% respectively. The prevalence of MetS remained higher in boys than in girls. The concentrations of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), serum uric acid (SUA), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were higher in the MetS children in comparison with non-MetS children (All p < 0.05), while the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) concentration was lower in MetS children. After adjusting for socioeconomic parameters in the multivariable regression model, MetS was strongly associated with ALT, SUA, HDL, and LDL. The five components of MetS indicated that abdominal obesity and a high serum triglyceride (TG) concentration were tightly linked with ALT, SUA, LDL, and CRP; while a low HDL concentration and elevated blood pressure were related to enhanced ALT, UA, and CRP. Additionally, impaired fasting glucose was only related to increased ALT. Conclusion: The epidemiological issues of MetS in Beijing adolescents should be known across socioeconomic classes. Early intervention strategies, such as dietary pattern interventions and physical excise, should be designed for that population to reduce the disease burdens of cardiovascular disease (CVD), Type 2 diabetes (T2D), and steatohepatitis in adulthood. View Full-Text
Keywords: MetS; ALT; SUA; CRP; LDL; adolescent MetS; ALT; SUA; CRP; LDL; adolescent
MDPI and ACS Style

Zhao, Y.; Yu, Y.; Li, H.; Li, M.; Zhang, D.; Guo, D.; Yu, X.; Lu, C.; Wang, H. The Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Biochemical Markers in Beijing Adolescents. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4557.

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