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Article

Do Compactness and Poly-Centricity Mitigate PM10 Emissions? Evidence from Yangtze River Delta Area

1
College of Economics and Management, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 211106, China
2
School of Economics and Management, Nanjing Institute of Technology, Nanjing 211167, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4204; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214204
Received: 8 October 2019 / Revised: 24 October 2019 / Accepted: 28 October 2019 / Published: 30 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Climate Change)
The Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region is one of the most densely populated and economically developed areas in China, which provides an ideal environment with which to study the various strategies, such as compact and polycentric development advocated by researchers to reduce air pollution. Using the data of YRD cities from 2011–2017, the spatial durbin model (SDM) is presented to investigate how compactness (in terms of urban density, jobs-housing balance, and urban centralization) and poly-centricity (in terms of the number of centers and polycentric cluster) affect PM10 emissions. After controlling some variables, the results suggest that more jobs-housing-balanced and centralized compactness tends to decrease emissions, while poly-centricity by developing too many centers is expected to result in more pollutant emissions. The effect of high-density compactness is more controversial. In addition, for cities with more private car ownerships (>10 million within cities), enhancing the polycentric cluster by achieving a more balanced population distribution between the traditional centers and sub-centers could reduce emissions, whereas this mitigated emissions effect may be limited. The difference between our study and western studies suggests that the correlation between high-density compactness and air pollution vary with the specific characteristics and with spatial planning implications, as this paper concludes. View Full-Text
Keywords: PM10 emissions; compactness; poly-centricity; vehicle mile travelled; congestion; Yangtze River Delta PM10 emissions; compactness; poly-centricity; vehicle mile travelled; congestion; Yangtze River Delta
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tao, J.; Wang, Y.; Wang, R.; Mi, C. Do Compactness and Poly-Centricity Mitigate PM10 Emissions? Evidence from Yangtze River Delta Area. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4204. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214204

AMA Style

Tao J, Wang Y, Wang R, Mi C. Do Compactness and Poly-Centricity Mitigate PM10 Emissions? Evidence from Yangtze River Delta Area. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(21):4204. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214204

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tao, Jing, Ying Wang, Rong Wang, and Chuanmin Mi. 2019. "Do Compactness and Poly-Centricity Mitigate PM10 Emissions? Evidence from Yangtze River Delta Area" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 21: 4204. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214204

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