Next Article in Journal
Anaerobic Dechlorination by a Humin-Dependent Pentachlorophenol-Dechlorinating Consortium under Autotrophic Conditions Induced by Homoacetogenesis
Previous Article in Journal
Corruption, Hidden Economy and Environmental Pollution: A Spatial Econometric Analysis Based on China’s Provincial Panel Data
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Comparison of Short-Term Associations between PM2.5 Components and Mortality across Six Major Cities in South Korea

1
Environmental Health Research Division, National Institute of Environmental Research, Incheon 22689, Korea
2
Department of Public Health Sciences, Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
3
Air Quality Research Division, National Institute of Environmental Research, Incheon 22689, Korea
4
Department of Cancer Control and Population Health, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonngi 10408, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2872; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162872
Received: 28 May 2019 / Revised: 6 August 2019 / Accepted: 6 August 2019 / Published: 11 August 2019
  |  
PDF [797 KB, uploaded 13 August 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Association between short-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mortality or morbidity varies geographically, and this variation could be due to different chemical composition affected by local sources. However, there have been only a few Asian studies possibly due to limited monitoring data. Using nationwide regulatory monitoring data of PM2.5 chemical components in South Korea, we aimed to compare the associations between daily exposure to PM2.5 components and mortality across six major cities. We obtained daily 24-h concentrations of PM2.5 and 11 PM2.5 components measured from 2013 to 2015 at single sites located in residential areas. We used death certificate data to compute the daily counts of nonaccidental, cardiovascular, and respiratory deaths. Using the generalized additive model, we estimated relative risks of daily mortality for an interquartile range increase in each pollutant concentration, while controlling for a longer-term time trend and meteorology. While elemental carbon was consistently associated with nonaccidental mortality across all cities, nickel and vanadium were strongly associated with respiratory or cardiovascular mortality in Busan and Ulsan, two large port cities. Our study shows that PM2.5 components responsible for PM2.5-associated mortality differed across cities depending on the dominant pollution sources, such as traffic and oil combustion. View Full-Text
Keywords: chemical component; fine particle; mortality; short-term; time-series study chemical component; fine particle; mortality; short-term; time-series study
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Yoo, S.-E.; Park, J.-S.; Lee, S.H.; Park, C.-H.; Lee, C.-W.; Lee, S.-B.; Yu, S.D.; Kim, S.-Y.; Kim, H. Comparison of Short-Term Associations between PM2.5 Components and Mortality across Six Major Cities in South Korea. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2872.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top