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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle

Adolescent Smoking in Secondary Schools that Have Implemented Smoke-Free Policies: In-Depth Exploration of Shared Smoking Patterns

1
Department of Public Health, Amsterdam Public Health Institute, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2
Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Department of Communication, University of Amsterdam, 1018 WV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(12), 2100; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16122100
Received: 19 April 2019 / Revised: 31 May 2019 / Accepted: 12 June 2019 / Published: 13 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue School Health and Wellbeing)
Large numbers of adolescents smoke during school hours, despite the implementation of smoke-free school policies (SFSPs). Studies about SFSPs predominantly analyse smoking as individual behaviour, yet there is increasing recognition that smoking should be understood as social behaviour. We explored shared smoking patterns specifying where, when, and with whom, and social meanings about why groups of adolescents smoke in two Dutch schools that have implemented SFSPs. Surveys among adolescents were held to obtain contextual information about the schools. Four focus group discussions and fourteen individual interviews were held with adolescents to identify shared smoking patterns in each school. Two shared patterns were identified at a school where 17% of students smoked daily: Dependent smoking and Rebellious smoking. Both built on pro-smoking norms and underscored the benefits of smoking. Three shared patterns were identified at a school where 3% of students smoked daily: Social bonding smoking, Low-profile smoking and Smoking-friendly event smoking. These built on anti-smoking norms and helped smokers cope with negative social judgements related to smoking. We conclude that adolescent smoking during school hours is embedded in diverse shared smoking patterns. Future studies should develop more understanding about how to deal with adolescents’ shared smoking patterns that decrease the effectiveness of tobacco policies. View Full-Text
Keywords: Smoking; adolescents; smoke-free school policies; tobacco control; shared smoking patterns; social context Smoking; adolescents; smoke-free school policies; tobacco control; shared smoking patterns; social context
MDPI and ACS Style

Schreuders, M.; Klompmaker, L.; van den Putte, B.; Kunst, A.E. Adolescent Smoking in Secondary Schools that Have Implemented Smoke-Free Policies: In-Depth Exploration of Shared Smoking Patterns. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2100.

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