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Open AccessArticle

Bisphenol A, Tobacco Smoke, and Age as Predictors of Oxidative Stress in Children and Adolescents

1
Department of Public Health and Pediatrics, University of Turin, 10126 Turin, Italy
2
Consultant of OMP (observatory of professional diseases) of the Turin Court Prosecutor’s Office, Turin 10100, Italy
3
Cancer Epidemiology, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Turin 10126, Italy
4
Unit of Pneumology and Tisiology, National Health Service (ASL TO2), Torino 10100, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(11), 2025; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16112025
Received: 16 April 2019 / Revised: 4 June 2019 / Accepted: 5 June 2019 / Published: 6 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution Impact on Children’s Health)
Objectives. The purpose of this study was to investigate bisphenol A (BPA) and its role in the induction of oxidative stress and confirm the same for tobacco smoke. Methods. A total of 223 young, healthy students (7–19 years old) were recruited in Chivasso, Italy. A spot of urine of each subject was analyzed to quantify BPA, cotinine, and 15F2t-isoprostane. Results. BPA showed a slight increase of concentration proportional with increasing age, even though the 11–14 years age group had slightly lower results, inducing a V-shape. The same trend was observed for 15F2t-isoprostane and cotinine. The result of piecewise linear robust regression shows a break point of the effect of BPA on 15F2t-isoprostane at 6 ng/mg CREA (p < 0.001). At higher levels, 15F2t-isoprostane shows an exponential increase by more than threefold for each one-log unit of BPA. An increase of oxidative stress due to BPA was observed, but only from 6 ng/mg of CREA up. Passive tobacco smoke is also able to induce an increase in oxidative stress. Conclusion. Prevention against BPA and passive tobacco smoke represents an important tool for promoting the highest health standard. View Full-Text
Keywords: oxidative stress; adolescents; passive tobacco smoke; BPA; public health oxidative stress; adolescents; passive tobacco smoke; BPA; public health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bono, R.; Bellisario, V.; Tassinari, R.; Squillacioti, G.; Manetta, T.; Bugiani, M.; Migliore, E.; Piccioni, P. Bisphenol A, Tobacco Smoke, and Age as Predictors of Oxidative Stress in Children and Adolescents. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2025. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16112025

AMA Style

Bono R, Bellisario V, Tassinari R, Squillacioti G, Manetta T, Bugiani M, Migliore E, Piccioni P. Bisphenol A, Tobacco Smoke, and Age as Predictors of Oxidative Stress in Children and Adolescents. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(11):2025. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16112025

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bono, Roberto; Bellisario, Valeria; Tassinari, Roberta; Squillacioti, Giulia; Manetta, Tilde; Bugiani, Massimiliano; Migliore, Enrica; Piccioni, Pavilio. 2019. "Bisphenol A, Tobacco Smoke, and Age as Predictors of Oxidative Stress in Children and Adolescents" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 11: 2025. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16112025

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