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Article

Older Adults Using Our Voice Citizen Science to Create Change in Their Neighborhood Environment

1
Director, Postgraduate Coursework Programs (Nursing, Midwifery), The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
2
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
3
Healthy Connections Exercise Clinic, Burnie Brae Ltd., Chermside, QLD 4032, Australia
4
Centre for Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4102, Australia
5
Department of Health Research and Policy and Medicine, Stanford Prevention, Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
On behalf of Burnie Brae Citizen Scientists, Burnie Brae Ltd., Chermside, QLD 4032, Australia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2685; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122685
Received: 29 September 2018 / Revised: 20 November 2018 / Accepted: 26 November 2018 / Published: 28 November 2018
Physical activity, primarily comprised of walking in older adults, confers benefits for psychological health and mental well-being, functional status outcomes and social outcomes. In many communities, however, access to physical activity opportunities are limited, especially for older adults. This exploratory study engaged a small sample (N = 8) of adults aged 65 or older as citizen scientists to assess and then work to improve their communities. Using a uniquely designed mobile application (the Stanford Healthy Neighborhood Discovery Tool), participants recorded a total of 83 geocoded photos and audio narratives of physical environment features that served to help or hinder physical activity in and around their community center. In a facilitated process the citizen scientists then discussed, coded and synthesized their data. The citizen scientists then leveraged their findings to advocate with local decision-makers for specific community improvements to promote physical activity. These changes focused on: parks/playgrounds, footpaths, and traffic related safety/parking. Project results suggest that the Our Voice approach can be an effective strategy for the global goals of advancing rights and increasing self-determination among older adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: older adult; physical activity; social connectedness; physical environment; citizen science; Discovery Tool older adult; physical activity; social connectedness; physical environment; citizen science; Discovery Tool
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tuckett, A.G.; Freeman, A.; Hetherington, S.; Gardiner, P.A.; King, A.C.; On behalf of Burnie Brae Citizen Scientists. Older Adults Using Our Voice Citizen Science to Create Change in Their Neighborhood Environment. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2685. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122685

AMA Style

Tuckett AG, Freeman A, Hetherington S, Gardiner PA, King AC, On behalf of Burnie Brae Citizen Scientists. Older Adults Using Our Voice Citizen Science to Create Change in Their Neighborhood Environment. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(12):2685. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122685

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tuckett, Anthony G., Abbey Freeman, Sharon Hetherington, Paul A. Gardiner, Abby C. King, and On behalf of Burnie Brae Citizen Scientists. 2018. "Older Adults Using Our Voice Citizen Science to Create Change in Their Neighborhood Environment" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15, no. 12: 2685. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122685

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