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Does Instruction of Oral Health Behavior for Workers Improve Work Performance?—Quasi-Randomized Trial

1
Department of Preventive Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8558, Japan
2
Department of Preventive Dentistry, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama 700-8558, Japan
3
Section of Geriatric Dentistry and Perioperative Medicine in Dentistry, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan
4
OBT Research Center, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2630; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122630
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 19 November 2018 / Accepted: 22 November 2018 / Published: 24 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Worker and Public Health and Safety: Current Views)
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Abstract

Oral disease can cause economic loss due to impaired work performance. Therefore, improvement of oral health status and prevention of oral disease is essential among workers. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether oral health-related behavioral modification intervention influences work performance or improves oral health behavior and oral health status among Japanese workers. We quasi-randomly separated participants into the intervention group or the control group at baseline. The intervention group received intensive oral health instruction at baseline and a self-assessment every three months. Both groups received oral examinations and answered the self-questionnaire at baseline and at one-year follow-up. At follow-up, the prevalence of subjects who use fluoride toothpastes and interdental brushes/dental floss were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group. Three variables (tooth brushing in workplace, using fluoride toothpaste, and experience of receiving tooth brushing instruction in a dental clinic) showed significant improvement only in the intervention group. On the other hand, work performance and oral status did not significantly change in either group. Our intensive oral health-related behavioral modification intervention improved oral health behavior, but neither work performance nor oral status, among Japanese workers. View Full-Text
Keywords: work performance; oral health; intervention study; behavioral modification work performance; oral health; intervention study; behavioral modification
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Toyama, N.; Taniguchi-Tabata, A.; Sawada, N.; Sugiura, Y.; Fukuhara, D.; Uchida, Y.; Miyai, H.; Yokoi, A.; Mizutani, S.; Ekuni, D.; Morita, M. Does Instruction of Oral Health Behavior for Workers Improve Work Performance?—Quasi-Randomized Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2630.

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