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Changes in Metabolic Syndrome Severity Following Individualized Versus Standardized Exercise Prescription: A Feasibility Study

1
Auckland University of Technology, Human Potential Centre, Auckland 0632, New Zealand
2
Western Colorado University, Recreation and Exercise & Sport Science, Gunnison, CO 81231, USA
3
Colorado Mountain College, Health and Wellness, Aspen, CO 81611, USA
4
SHAPE Research Centre, Exercise Science and Clinical Exercise Physiology, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide 5000, Australia
5
Centre for Research on Exercise, Physical Activity and Health, School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
6
Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland 0632, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2594; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112594
Received: 10 October 2018 / Revised: 6 November 2018 / Accepted: 15 November 2018 / Published: 20 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Physical Activity and Public Health)
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Abstract

This study sought to investigate the efficacy of standardized versus individualized exercise intensity prescription on metabolic syndrome (MetS) severity following a 12-week exercise intervention. A total of 38 experimental participants (47.8 ± 12.2 yr, 170.7 ± 8.0 cm, 82.6 ± 18.7 kg, 26.9 ± 6.7 mL·k−1·min−1) were randomized to one of two exercise interventions (exercise intensity prescribed using heart rate reserve or ventilatory threshold). Following the 12-week intervention, MetS z-score was significantly improved for the standardized (−2.0 ± 3.1 to −2.8 ± 2.8 [p = 0.01]) and individualized (−3.3 ± 2.3 to −3.9 ± 2.2 [p = 0.04]) groups. When separating participants based on prevalence of MetS at baseline and MetS z-score responsiveness, there were six and three participants in the standardized and individualized groups, respectively, with three or more MetS risk factors. Of the six participants in the standardized group, 83% (5/6) of the participants were considered responders, whereas 100% (3/3) of the individualized participants were responders. Furthermore, only 17% (1/6) of the participants with MetS at baseline in the standardized group no longer had symptoms of MetS following the intervention. In the individualized group, 67% (2/3) of participants with baseline MetS were not considered to have MetS at week 12. These findings suggest that an individualized approach to the exercise intensity prescription may ameliorate the severity of MetS. View Full-Text
Keywords: training responsiveness; MetS z-score; personalized medicine; exercise non-responders; ventilatory threshold; HRR training responsiveness; MetS z-score; personalized medicine; exercise non-responders; ventilatory threshold; HRR
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Weatherwax, R.M.; Ramos, J.S.; Harris, N.K.; Kilding, A.E.; Dalleck, L.C. Changes in Metabolic Syndrome Severity Following Individualized Versus Standardized Exercise Prescription: A Feasibility Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2594.

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