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Article

Camphor, Applied Epidermally to the Back, Causes Snout- and Chest-Grooming in Rats: A Response Mediated by Cutaneous TRP Channels

1
Graduate Program in Neuroscience and Cognition, Federal University of ABC, São Bernardo do Campo 09606-070, SP, Brazil
2
Thermoregulation and Systemic Inflammation Laboratory (FeverLab), Trauma Research, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA
3
Center for Natural and Human Sciences, Federal University of ABC, São Bernardo do Campo 09606-070, SP, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Pharmaceuticals 2019, 12(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph12010024
Received: 1 December 2018 / Revised: 21 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
Thermoregulatory grooming, a behavioral defense against heat, is known to be driven by skin-temperature signals. Because at least some thermal cutaneous signals that drive heat defenses are likely to be generated by transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, we hypothesized that warmth-sensitive TRPs drive thermoregulatory grooming. Adult male Wistar rats were used. We showed that camphor, a nonselective agonist of several TRP channels, including vanilloid (V) 3, when applied epidermally to the back (500 mg/kg), caused a pronounced self-grooming response, including paw-licking and snout- and chest-“washing”. By the percentage of time spent grooming, the response was similar to the thermoregulatory grooming observed during exposure to ambient warmth (32 °C). Ruthenium red (a non-selective antagonist of TRP channels, including TRPV3), when administered intravenously at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg, attenuated the self-grooming behavior induced by either ambient warmth or epidermal camphor. Furthermore, the intravenous administration of AMG8432 (40 mg/kg), a relatively selective TRPV3 antagonist, also attenuated the self-grooming response to epidermal camphor. We conclude that camphor causes the self-grooming behavior by acting on TRP channels in the skin. We propose that cutaneous warmth signals mediated by TRP channels, possibly including TRPV3, drive thermoregulatory self-grooming in rats. View Full-Text
Keywords: AMG8432; anxiety; behavioral thermoregulation; body temperature; camphor; heat defenses; heat exposure; ruthenium red; thermoregulatory behaviors; TRPV3 AMG8432; anxiety; behavioral thermoregulation; body temperature; camphor; heat defenses; heat exposure; ruthenium red; thermoregulatory behaviors; TRPV3
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ishikawa, D.T.; Vizin, R.C.L.; Souza, C.O.d.; Carrettiero, D.C.; Romanovsky, A.A.; Almeida, M.C. Camphor, Applied Epidermally to the Back, Causes Snout- and Chest-Grooming in Rats: A Response Mediated by Cutaneous TRP Channels. Pharmaceuticals 2019, 12, 24. https://doi.org/10.3390/ph12010024

AMA Style

Ishikawa DT, Vizin RCL, Souza COd, Carrettiero DC, Romanovsky AA, Almeida MC. Camphor, Applied Epidermally to the Back, Causes Snout- and Chest-Grooming in Rats: A Response Mediated by Cutaneous TRP Channels. Pharmaceuticals. 2019; 12(1):24. https://doi.org/10.3390/ph12010024

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ishikawa, Débora T., Robson C.L. Vizin, Cristiane O.d. Souza, Daniel C. Carrettiero, Andrej A. Romanovsky, and Maria C. Almeida 2019. "Camphor, Applied Epidermally to the Back, Causes Snout- and Chest-Grooming in Rats: A Response Mediated by Cutaneous TRP Channels" Pharmaceuticals 12, no. 1: 24. https://doi.org/10.3390/ph12010024

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