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Article

Measuring Gait Velocity and Stride Length with an Ultrawide Bandwidth Local Positioning System and an Inertial Measurement Unit

1
Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
2
Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Drew Smith
Sensors 2021, 21(9), 2896; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21092896
Received: 31 March 2021 / Revised: 16 April 2021 / Accepted: 20 April 2021 / Published: 21 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensor-Based Measurement of Human Motor Performance)
One possible modality to profile gait speed and stride length includes using wearable technologies. Wearable technology using global positioning system (GPS) receivers may not be a feasible means to measure gait speed. An alternative may include a local positioning system (LPS). Considering that LPS wearables are not good at determining gait events such as heel strikes, applying sensor fusion with an inertial measurement unit (IMU) may be beneficial. Speed and stride length determined from an ultrawide bandwidth LPS equipped with an IMU were compared to video motion capture (i.e., the “gold standard”) as the criterion standard. Ninety participants performed trials at three self-selected walk, run and sprint speeds. After processing location, speed and acceleration data from the measurement systems, speed between the last five meters and stride length in the last stride of the trial were analyzed. Small biases and strong positive intraclass correlations (0.9–1.0) between the LPS and “the gold standard” were found. The significance of the study is that the LPS can be a valid method to determine speed and stride length. Variability of speed and stride length can be reduced when exploring data processing methods that can better extract speed and stride length measurements. View Full-Text
Keywords: local positioning system; Bland–Altman; motion analysis; gait local positioning system; Bland–Altman; motion analysis; gait
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MDPI and ACS Style

Singh, P.; Esposito, M.; Barrons, Z.; Clermont, C.A.; Wannop, J.; Stefanyshyn, D. Measuring Gait Velocity and Stride Length with an Ultrawide Bandwidth Local Positioning System and an Inertial Measurement Unit. Sensors 2021, 21, 2896. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21092896

AMA Style

Singh P, Esposito M, Barrons Z, Clermont CA, Wannop J, Stefanyshyn D. Measuring Gait Velocity and Stride Length with an Ultrawide Bandwidth Local Positioning System and an Inertial Measurement Unit. Sensors. 2021; 21(9):2896. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21092896

Chicago/Turabian Style

Singh, Pratham, Michael Esposito, Zach Barrons, Christian A. Clermont, John Wannop, and Darren Stefanyshyn. 2021. "Measuring Gait Velocity and Stride Length with an Ultrawide Bandwidth Local Positioning System and an Inertial Measurement Unit" Sensors 21, no. 9: 2896. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21092896

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