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Communication

The Ultraviolet Index Is Well Estimated by the Terrestrial Irradiance at 310 nm

1
Shade, 111 Ideation Way, B511, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA
2
Hackensack Meridian Center for Discovery and Innovation, 111 Ideation Way, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ki H. Chon
Sensors 2021, 21(16), 5528; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21165528
Received: 22 June 2021 / Revised: 30 July 2021 / Accepted: 11 August 2021 / Published: 17 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Sensors for Wearable Applications)
Ultraviolet (UV) exposure significantly contributes to non-melanoma skin cancer. In the context of health, UV exposure is the product of time and the UV Index (UVI), a weighted sum of the irradiance I(λ) over all wavelengths from λ = 250 to 400 nm. In our analysis of the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s UV-Net database of over 400,000 spectral irradiance measurements taken over several years, we found that the UVI is well estimated by 77 I310. To further understand this result, we applied an optical atmospheric model to generate terrestrial irradiance spectra and found that it applies across a wide range of conditions. An accurate UVI radiometer can be built from a photodiode covered by a bandpass filter centered at 310 nm. View Full-Text
Keywords: ultraviolet index; ozone layer; atmospheric models; skin cancer risk; calibration; wearable sensor; photodiode ultraviolet index; ozone layer; atmospheric models; skin cancer risk; calibration; wearable sensor; photodiode
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kaplan, P.D.; Dumont, E.L.P. The Ultraviolet Index Is Well Estimated by the Terrestrial Irradiance at 310 nm. Sensors 2021, 21, 5528. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21165528

AMA Style

Kaplan PD, Dumont ELP. The Ultraviolet Index Is Well Estimated by the Terrestrial Irradiance at 310 nm. Sensors. 2021; 21(16):5528. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21165528

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kaplan, Peter D., and Emmanuel L.P. Dumont 2021. "The Ultraviolet Index Is Well Estimated by the Terrestrial Irradiance at 310 nm" Sensors 21, no. 16: 5528. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21165528

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