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Letter

Exploring New Potential Applications for Hand Exoskeletons: Power Grip to Assist Human Standing

1
Biomedical Neuroengineering Group, Universidad Miguel Hernández, 03202 Elche, Spain
2
Robotics and Rehabilitation Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2021, 21(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21010030
Received: 27 November 2020 / Revised: 10 December 2020 / Accepted: 19 December 2020 / Published: 23 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors Technology for Medical Robotics)
Hand exoskeleton potential applications reach further than grasping or assistance during manipulation. In this paper, we present a preliminary study of how this technology can be applied in order to improve performance during standing to help the user to keep balance under perturbations. Non-impaired users wearing a hand exoskeleton gripping a hand rail were pushed by a cable-driven robot, so that their standing equilibrium was perturbed. The center of pressure, surface electromyography, and interaction force data were recorded in order to assess the performance of users and their postural strategy. The results showed that users could keep their balance with the same outcomes using their bare hands and the hand exoskeleton. However, when wearing the exoskeleton, a higher muscular activity was registered in hand flexor muscles. This is also supported by the grasping force, which shows that users stretched their hand more than expected when wearing the hand exoskeleton. This paper concludes that it is possible that the lack of tactile feedback could lead to over compensation in the grasping. Therefore, the next studies will aim to check whether this effect can be reversed by training users to wear the exoskeleton. View Full-Text
Keywords: exoskeletons; rehabilitation robotics; biomechanics; electromyography; upper limb; postural assessment exoskeletons; rehabilitation robotics; biomechanics; electromyography; upper limb; postural assessment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Diez, J.A.; Santamaria, V.; Khan, M.I.; Catalán, J.M.; Garcia-Aracil, N.; Agrawal, S.K. Exploring New Potential Applications for Hand Exoskeletons: Power Grip to Assist Human Standing. Sensors 2021, 21, 30. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21010030

AMA Style

Diez JA, Santamaria V, Khan MI, Catalán JM, Garcia-Aracil N, Agrawal SK. Exploring New Potential Applications for Hand Exoskeletons: Power Grip to Assist Human Standing. Sensors. 2021; 21(1):30. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21010030

Chicago/Turabian Style

Diez, Jorge A., Victor Santamaria, Moiz I. Khan, José M. Catalán, Nicolas Garcia-Aracil, and Sunil K. Agrawal. 2021. "Exploring New Potential Applications for Hand Exoskeletons: Power Grip to Assist Human Standing" Sensors 21, no. 1: 30. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21010030

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