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Article

Assessing the Effects of Kata and Kumite Techniques on Physical Performance in Elite Karatekas

1
Department of Economics, Engineering, Society and Business Organization (DEIM), University of Tuscia, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
2
Motustech – Sport & Health Technology c/o Marilab, 00121 Ostia Lido, Rome, Italy
3
FIAMME ORO – Polizia di Stato, 00148 Rome, Italy
4
FIJLKAM – Italian Federation of Judo, Wrestling, Karate and Martial Arts, 00100 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors have contributed equally to this work.
Sensors 2020, 20(11), 3186; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20113186
Received: 12 May 2020 / Revised: 27 May 2020 / Accepted: 2 June 2020 / Published: 3 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensor-Based Systems for Kinematics and Kinetics)
This study aimed at assessing physical performance of elite karatekas and non-karatekas. More specifically, effects of kumite and kata technique on joint mobility, body stability, and jumping ability were assessed by enrolling twenty-four karatekas and by comparing the results with 18 non-karatekas healthy subjects. Sensor system was composed by a single inertial sensor and optical bars. Karatekas are generally characterized by better motor performance with respect non-karatekas, considering all the examined factors, i.e., mobility, stability, and jumping. In addition, the two techniques lead to a differentiation in joint mobility; in particular, kumite athletes are characterized by a greater shoulder extension and, in general, by a greater value of preferred velocity to perform joint movements. Conversely, kata athletes are characterized by a greater mobility of the ankle joint. By focusing on jumping skills, kata technique leads to an increase of the concentric phase when performing squat jump. Finally, kata athletes showed better stability in closed eyes condition. The outcomes reported here can be useful for optimizing coaching programs for both beginners and karatekas based on the specific selected technique. View Full-Text
Keywords: karate; sport biomechanics; inertial sensors; body stability; joint mobility; jumping karate; sport biomechanics; inertial sensors; body stability; joint mobility; jumping
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MDPI and ACS Style

Molinaro, L.; Taborri, J.; Montecchiani, M.; Rossi, S. Assessing the Effects of Kata and Kumite Techniques on Physical Performance in Elite Karatekas. Sensors 2020, 20, 3186. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20113186

AMA Style

Molinaro L, Taborri J, Montecchiani M, Rossi S. Assessing the Effects of Kata and Kumite Techniques on Physical Performance in Elite Karatekas. Sensors. 2020; 20(11):3186. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20113186

Chicago/Turabian Style

Molinaro, Luca, Juri Taborri, Massimo Montecchiani, and Stefano Rossi. 2020. "Assessing the Effects of Kata and Kumite Techniques on Physical Performance in Elite Karatekas" Sensors 20, no. 11: 3186. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20113186

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