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Open AccessArticle

Does the Femoral Head Size in Hip Arthroplasty Influence Lower Body Movements during Squats, Gait and Stair Walking? A Clinical Pilot Study Based on Wearable Motion Sensors

1
Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden
2
Department of surgical and perioperative sciences, Umeå university, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden
3
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2019, 19(14), 3240; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19143240
Received: 15 May 2019 / Revised: 18 July 2019 / Accepted: 22 July 2019 / Published: 23 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gyroscopes and Accelerometers)
A hip prosthesis design with larger femoral head size may improve functional outcomes compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA) design. Our aim was to compare the range of motion (RoM) in lower body joints during squats, gait and stair walking using a wearable movement analysis system based on inertial measurement units (IMUs) in three age-matched male groups: 6 males with a conventional THA (THAC), 9 with a large femoral head (LFH) design, and 8 hip- and knee-asymptomatic controls (CTRL). We hypothesized that the LFH design would allow a greater hip RoM, providing movement patterns more like CTRL, and a larger side difference in hip RoM in THAC when compared to LFH and controls. IMUs were attached to the pelvis, thighs and shanks during five trials of squats, gait, and stair ascending/descending performed at self-selected speed. THAC and LFH participants completed the Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS). The results showed a larger hip RoM during squats in LFH compared to THAC. Side differences in LFH and THAC groups (operated vs. non-operated side) indicated that movement function was not fully recovered in either group, further corroborated by non-maximal mean HOOS scores (LFH: 83 ± 13, THAC: 84 ± 19 groups, vs. normal function 100). The IMU system may have the potential to enhance clinical movement evaluations as an adjunct to clinical scales. View Full-Text
Keywords: MEMS; gyroscopes; accelerometers; total hip arthroplasty; movement analysis MEMS; gyroscopes; accelerometers; total hip arthroplasty; movement analysis
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Grip, H.; Nilsson, K.G.; Häger, C.K.; Lundström, R.; Öhberg, F. Does the Femoral Head Size in Hip Arthroplasty Influence Lower Body Movements during Squats, Gait and Stair Walking? A Clinical Pilot Study Based on Wearable Motion Sensors. Sensors 2019, 19, 3240.

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