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Open AccessArticle

Capacitive Sensing for Non-Invasive Breathing and Heart Monitoring in Non-Restrained, Non-Sedated Laboratory Mice

1
Fraunhofer-Institut fuer BiomedizinischeTechnik (IBMT), Sulzbach/Saar 66280, Germany
2
ITAP—Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Cauce 59, Valladolid 47011, Spain
3
Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine, University of Luxembourg Esch-sur-Alzette L-4362, Luxembourg and Internal Medicine II, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg 66421, Germany
4
Molecular and Cellular Biotechnology/Nanotechnology, Saarland University, Saarbruecken 66123, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Daniel Teichmann
Sensors 2016, 16(7), 1052; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16071052
Received: 24 May 2016 / Revised: 28 June 2016 / Accepted: 4 July 2016 / Published: 7 July 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noninvasive Biomedical Sensors)
Animal testing plays a vital role in biomedical research. Stress reduction is important for improving research results and increasing the welfare and the quality of life of laboratory animals. To estimate stress we believe it is of great importance to develop non-invasive techniques for monitoring physiological signals during the transport of laboratory animals, thereby allowing the gathering of information on the transport conditions, and, eventually, the improvement of these conditions. Here, we study the suitability of commercially available electric potential integrated circuit (EPIC) sensors, using both contact and contactless techniques, for monitoring the heart rate and breathing rate of non-restrained, non-sedated laboratory mice. The design has been tested under different scenarios with the aim of checking the plausibility of performing contactless capture of mouse heart activity (ideally with an electrocardiogram). First experimental results are shown. View Full-Text
Keywords: non-invasive sensor; capacitive sensors; physiological signals in mice; stress in mice non-invasive sensor; capacitive sensors; physiological signals in mice; stress in mice
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MDPI and ACS Style

González-Sánchez, C.; Fraile, J.-C.; Pérez-Turiel, J.; Damm, E.; Schneider, J.G.; Zimmermann, H.; Schmitt, D.; Ihmig, F.R. Capacitive Sensing for Non-Invasive Breathing and Heart Monitoring in Non-Restrained, Non-Sedated Laboratory Mice. Sensors 2016, 16, 1052. https://doi.org/10.3390/s16071052

AMA Style

González-Sánchez C, Fraile J-C, Pérez-Turiel J, Damm E, Schneider JG, Zimmermann H, Schmitt D, Ihmig FR. Capacitive Sensing for Non-Invasive Breathing and Heart Monitoring in Non-Restrained, Non-Sedated Laboratory Mice. Sensors. 2016; 16(7):1052. https://doi.org/10.3390/s16071052

Chicago/Turabian Style

González-Sánchez, Carlos; Fraile, Juan-Carlos; Pérez-Turiel, Javier; Damm, Ellen; Schneider, Jochen G.; Zimmermann, Heiko; Schmitt, Daniel; Ihmig, Frank R. 2016. "Capacitive Sensing for Non-Invasive Breathing and Heart Monitoring in Non-Restrained, Non-Sedated Laboratory Mice" Sensors 16, no. 7: 1052. https://doi.org/10.3390/s16071052

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