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Article

Mires in Europe—Regional Diversity, Condition and Protection

1
Institute of Botany and Landscape Ecology, Greifswald University, Partner in the Greifswald Mire Centre, 17487 Greifswald, Germany
2
Department of Natural History, NTNU University Museum, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
3
DUENE e.V., Partner in the Greifswald Mire Centre, 17487 Greifswald, Germany
4
UN Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC), Cambridge CB3 0DL, UK
5
Institute of Forest Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, 143030 Uspenskoye, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: François Munoz, Mariusz Lamentowicz and Corrado Battisti
Diversity 2021, 13(8), 381; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13080381
Received: 20 June 2021 / Revised: 30 July 2021 / Accepted: 10 August 2021 / Published: 16 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology, Biogeography and Evolutionary Biology of Peatlands)
In spite of the worldwide largest proportional loss of mires, Europe is a continent with important mire diversity. This article analyses the condition and protection status of European mire ecosystems. The overview is based on the system of European mire regions, representing regional variety and ecosystem biodiversity. We combined peatland distribution data with land cover maps of the Copernicus Land Monitoring Service as well as with the World Database on Protected Areas to assess the extent of degraded peatlands and the proportion of peatlands located in protected areas in each European mire region. The total proportion of degraded peatlands in Europe is 25%; within the EU it is 50% (120,000 km2). The proportion of degradation clearly increases from north to south, as does the proportion of peatlands located within protected areas. In more than half of Europe’s mire regions, the target of at least 17% of the area located in protected areas is not met with respect to peatlands. Data quality is discussed and the lessons learned from Europe for peatland conservation are presented. View Full-Text
Keywords: peatland; organic soil; mire type; biogeography; degradation; protected area peatland; organic soil; mire type; biogeography; degradation; protected area
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tanneberger, F.; Moen, A.; Barthelmes, A.; Lewis, E.; Miles, L.; Sirin, A.; Tegetmeyer, C.; Joosten, H. Mires in Europe—Regional Diversity, Condition and Protection. Diversity 2021, 13, 381. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13080381

AMA Style

Tanneberger F, Moen A, Barthelmes A, Lewis E, Miles L, Sirin A, Tegetmeyer C, Joosten H. Mires in Europe—Regional Diversity, Condition and Protection. Diversity. 2021; 13(8):381. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13080381

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tanneberger, Franziska, Asbjørn Moen, Alexandra Barthelmes, Edward Lewis, Lera Miles, Andrey Sirin, Cosima Tegetmeyer, and Hans Joosten. 2021. "Mires in Europe—Regional Diversity, Condition and Protection" Diversity 13, no. 8: 381. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13080381

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