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Article

Characterizing the Influence of Domestic Cats on Birds with Wildlife Rehabilitation Center Data

Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Sciences, 104 Nash Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
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Academic Editor: Michael Wink
Diversity 2021, 13(7), 322; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070322
Received: 18 June 2021 / Revised: 11 July 2021 / Accepted: 13 July 2021 / Published: 15 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2021 Feature Papers by Diversity’s Editorial Board Members)
Depredation of birds by domestic cats is hypothesized to be one of many significant sources of mortality leading to global bird declines. Direct observations are relatively rarely documented compared with large numbers of birds hypothesized to be killed or wounded by cats. We analyzed data from two wildlife rehabilitation centers located in Salem and Grants Pass, Oregon USA, to understand which species were most likely to interact with a cat, and the species traits associated with cat interactions and habitats (urban vs. rural) of rescued birds. Interaction with a cat was the second-most commonly reported cause of admission, representing 12.3% of 6345 admissions. Half to two-thirds of birds were rescued from cats in urban settings and were usually species foraging on or near the ground. Most species were admitted to rehabilitation centers in direct proportion to their regional abundance. An exception was the absence of common species weighing less than 70 g, which we conclude is an effect of sampling bias. We conclude that cats most often interact with regionally common near-ground-dwelling bird species in both urban and rural habitats. Wildlife rehabilitation centers can provide valuable sources of data for cat-bird interactions but potential sources of uncertainty and bias in their data need to be considered carefully. View Full-Text
Keywords: avian mortality; cat-bird interactions; cat predation; citizen science; domestic cat; human-wildlife conflict; wildlife rehabilitation avian mortality; cat-bird interactions; cat predation; citizen science; domestic cat; human-wildlife conflict; wildlife rehabilitation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Demezas, K.G.; Robinson, W.D. Characterizing the Influence of Domestic Cats on Birds with Wildlife Rehabilitation Center Data. Diversity 2021, 13, 322. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070322

AMA Style

Demezas KG, Robinson WD. Characterizing the Influence of Domestic Cats on Birds with Wildlife Rehabilitation Center Data. Diversity. 2021; 13(7):322. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070322

Chicago/Turabian Style

Demezas, K. G., and W. D. Robinson 2021. "Characterizing the Influence of Domestic Cats on Birds with Wildlife Rehabilitation Center Data" Diversity 13, no. 7: 322. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070322

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