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Article

Karstic Landscapes Are Foci of Species Diversity in the World’s Third-Largest Vertebrate Genus Cyrtodactylus Gray, 1827 (Reptilia: Squamata; Gekkonidae)

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Department of Biology, La Sierra University, 4500 Riverwalk Parkway, Riverside, CA 92505, USA
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Department of Biological Sciences and Museum of Natural History, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA
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Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Biological Faculty, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119234 Moscow, Russia
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Joint Russian-Vietnamese Tropical Research and Technological Center, Nghia Do, Cau Giay, Hanoi 10000, Vietnam
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Department of Environmental Ecology, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, University of Science, Vietnam National University, 334 Nguyen Trai Road, Hanoi 10000, Vietnam
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Central Institute for Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, Vietnam National University, 19 Le Thanh Tong Street, Hanoi 10000, Vietnam
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Department of Herpetology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024, USA
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Nature Exploration and Education Team, B-1/G-6, Soysapura Housing Scheme, Moratuwa 10400, Sri Lanka
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Research Center in Bioresources for Agriculture, Industry and Medicine, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand
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School of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Phayao, Phayao 56000, Thailand
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State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol/The Museum of Biology, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China
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Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 32 Jiaochang Donglu, Kunming 650223, China
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Laboratory of Herpetological Diversity and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.21, Qingsong Lu, Ciba, Panlong District, Kunming 650204, China
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Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum, National University of Singapore, 2 Conservatory Drive, Singapore 11737, Singapore
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Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
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Biodiversity and Geosciences Program, Queensland Museum, South Brisbane, QLD 4101, Australia
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Museum Zoologicum Bogoriense, Research Center for Biology, The Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Widyasatwaloka Building, Raya Jakarta Bogor, Km.46., Cibinong 16911, West Java, Indonesia
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Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Rue Vautier 29, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Eric Buffetaut
Diversity 2021, 13(5), 183; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13050183
Received: 23 March 2021 / Revised: 22 April 2021 / Accepted: 23 April 2021 / Published: 28 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evolutionary Ecology of Lizards)
Karstic landscapes are immense reservoirs of biodiversity and range-restricted endemism. Nowhere is this more evident than in the world’s third-largest vertebrate genus Cyrtodactylus (Gekkonidae) which contains well over 300 species. A stochastic character mapping analysis of 10 different habitat preferences across a phylogeny containing 344 described and undescribed species recovered a karst habitat preference occurring in 25.0% of the species, whereas that of the other eight specific habitat preferences occurred in only 0.2–11.0% of the species. The tenth category—general habitat preference—occurred in 38.7% of the species and was the ancestral habitat preference for Cyrtodactylus and the ultimate origin of all other habitat preferences. This study echoes the results of a previous study illustrating that karstic landscapes are generators of species diversity within Cyrtodactylus and not simply “imperiled arks of biodiversity” serving as refugia for relics. Unfortunately, the immense financial returns of mineral extraction to developing nations largely outweighs concerns for biodiversity conservation, leaving approximately 99% of karstic landscapes with no legal protection. This study continues to underscore the urgent need for their appropriate management and conservation. Additionally, this analysis supports the monophyly of the recently proposed 31 species groups and adds one additional species group. View Full-Text
Keywords: Indochina; Southeast Asia; phylogeny; Indo-Australian Archipelago; Bent-toed geckos; karst; conservation Indochina; Southeast Asia; phylogeny; Indo-Australian Archipelago; Bent-toed geckos; karst; conservation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Grismer, L.; Wood, P.L.; Poyarkov, N.A.; Le, M.D.; Karunarathna, S.; Chomdej, S.; Suwannapoom, C.; Qi, S.; Liu, S.; Che, J.; Quah, E.S.H.; Kraus, F.; Oliver, P.M.; Riyanto, A.; Pauwels, O.S.G.; Grismer, J.L. Karstic Landscapes Are Foci of Species Diversity in the World’s Third-Largest Vertebrate Genus Cyrtodactylus Gray, 1827 (Reptilia: Squamata; Gekkonidae). Diversity 2021, 13, 183. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13050183

AMA Style

Grismer L, Wood PL, Poyarkov NA, Le MD, Karunarathna S, Chomdej S, Suwannapoom C, Qi S, Liu S, Che J, Quah ESH, Kraus F, Oliver PM, Riyanto A, Pauwels OSG, Grismer JL. Karstic Landscapes Are Foci of Species Diversity in the World’s Third-Largest Vertebrate Genus Cyrtodactylus Gray, 1827 (Reptilia: Squamata; Gekkonidae). Diversity. 2021; 13(5):183. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13050183

Chicago/Turabian Style

Grismer, Lee; Wood, Perry L.; Poyarkov, Nikolay A.; Le, Minh D.; Karunarathna, Suranjan; Chomdej, Siriwadee; Suwannapoom, Chatmongkon; Qi, Shuo; Liu, Shuo; Che, Jing; Quah, Evan S.H.; Kraus, Fred; Oliver, Paul M.; Riyanto, Awal; Pauwels, Olivier S.G.; Grismer, Jesse L. 2021. "Karstic Landscapes Are Foci of Species Diversity in the World’s Third-Largest Vertebrate Genus Cyrtodactylus Gray, 1827 (Reptilia: Squamata; Gekkonidae)" Diversity 13, no. 5: 183. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13050183

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