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Article

Acclimatization Drives Differences in Reef-Building Coral Calcification Rates

1
Changing Oceans Group, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Grant Institute, James Hutton Road, King’s Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3FE, UK
2
Faculty of Landscape and Society, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Høgskoleveien 12, 1433 Ås, Norway
3
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149, USA
4
Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi, 46-007 Lilipuna Rd, Kāneʻohe, HI 96744, USA
5
Department of Life Sciences, Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, TX 78412, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(9), 347; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090347
Received: 27 July 2020 / Revised: 3 September 2020 / Accepted: 4 September 2020 / Published: 8 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coral Reef Ecology and Biodiversity)
Coral reefs are susceptible to climate change, anthropogenic influence, and environmental stressors. However, corals in Kāneʻohe Bay, Hawaiʻi have repeatedly shown resilience and acclimatization to anthropogenically-induced rising temperatures and increased frequencies of bleaching events. Variations in coral and algae cover at two sites—just 600 m apart—at Malaukaʻa fringing reef suggest genetic or environmental differences in coral resilience between sites. A reciprocal transplant experiment was conducted to determine if calcification (linear extension and dry skeletal weight) for dominant reef-building species, Montipora capitata and Porites compressa, varied between the two sites and whether or not parent colony or environmental factors were responsible for the differences. Despite the two sites representing distinct environmental conditions with significant differences between temperature, salinity, and aragonite saturation, M. capitata growth rates remained the same between sites and treatments. However, dry skeletal weight increases in P. compressa were significantly different between sites, but not across treatments, with linear mixed effects model results suggesting heterogeneity driven by environmental differences between sites and the parent colonies. These results provide evidence of resilience and acclimatization for M. capitata and P. compressa. Variability of resilience may be driven by local adaptations at a small, reef-level scale for P. compressa in Kāneʻohe Bay. View Full-Text
Keywords: acclimatization; accretion; calcification; coral reefs; dry skeletal weight; Kāne’ohe Bay; linear extension; Montipora capitata; Porites compressa; reciprocal transplant; resilience acclimatization; accretion; calcification; coral reefs; dry skeletal weight; Kāne’ohe Bay; linear extension; Montipora capitata; Porites compressa; reciprocal transplant; resilience
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    Doi: https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.921676
    Link: https://www.pangaea.de/tok/ba0f43f699ea9a4fb21bc0297ea7a18ed54da668
    Description: Data reposited: Barnhill, Kelsey Archer; Brown, Colleen; McGowan, Ashley; Bahr, Keisha (2020): Reciprocal transplant coral growth rates for Porites compressa and Montipora capitata in Kāneʻohe Bay, Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi, 2018. PANGAEA, https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.921676
MDPI and ACS Style

Barnhill, K.A.; Jogee, N.; Brown, C.; McGowan, A.; Rodgers, K.; Bryceson, I.; Bahr, K. Acclimatization Drives Differences in Reef-Building Coral Calcification Rates. Diversity 2020, 12, 347. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090347

AMA Style

Barnhill KA, Jogee N, Brown C, McGowan A, Rodgers K, Bryceson I, Bahr K. Acclimatization Drives Differences in Reef-Building Coral Calcification Rates. Diversity. 2020; 12(9):347. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090347

Chicago/Turabian Style

Barnhill, Kelsey A., Nadia Jogee, Colleen Brown, Ashley McGowan, Ku’ulei Rodgers, Ian Bryceson, and Keisha Bahr. 2020. "Acclimatization Drives Differences in Reef-Building Coral Calcification Rates" Diversity 12, no. 9: 347. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090347

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