Next Article in Journal
Stand out from the Crowd: Small-Scale Genetic Structuring in the Endemic Sicilian Pond Turtle
Next Article in Special Issue
Range-Wide Population Assessment of the Endangered Yellow-Naped Amazon (Amazona auropalliata)
Previous Article in Journal
Raccoon Vigilance and Activity Patterns When Sympatric with Coyotes
Previous Article in Special Issue
Opportunistic or Non-Random Wildlife Crime? Attractiveness Rather Than Abundance in the Wild Leads to Selective Parrot Poaching
Open AccessArticle

Using Peoples’ Perceptions to Improve Conservation Programs: The Yellow-Shouldered Amazon in Venezuela

1
Provita, Calle La Joya, Edificio Unidad Técnica del Este, Piso 10, Oficina 30, Chacao, Caracas 1060, Venezuela
2
School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia
3
Centro de Ecología, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apdo. 20632, Caracas 1020-A, Venezuela
4
IUCN Species Survival Commission, 28 rue Mauverney, CH-1196 Gland, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(9), 342; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090342
Received: 31 July 2020 / Revised: 28 August 2020 / Accepted: 29 August 2020 / Published: 5 September 2020
The perceptions and attitudes of local communities help understand the social drivers of unsustainable wildlife use and the social acceptability of conservation programs. We evaluated the social context influencing illegal harvesting of the threatened yellow-shouldered Amazon (Amazona barbadensis) and the effectiveness of a longstanding conservation program in the Macanao Peninsula, Margarita Island, Venezuela. We interviewed 496 people from three communities and documented their perceptions about (1) status and the impact of threats to parrot populations, (2) acceptability of the conservation program, and (3) social processes influencing unsustainable parrot use. Approval of the program was high, but it failed to engage communities despite their high conservation awareness and positive attitudes towards the species. People identified unsustainable use as the main threat to parrots, but negative perceptions were limited to selling, not harvesting or keeping. Harvesters with different motivations (keepers, sellers) may occur in Macanao, and social acceptability of both actors may differ. Future efforts will require a stakeholder engagement strategy to manage conflicts and incentives to participation. A better understanding of different categories of harvesters, as well as their motives and role in the illegal trade network would provide insights to the design of a behavior change campaign. View Full-Text
Keywords: conservation management; conservation threats; drivers of extinction; illegal wildlife trade; parrot conservation; Psittacidae conservation; threatened species; unsustainable use of wildlife conservation management; conservation threats; drivers of extinction; illegal wildlife trade; parrot conservation; Psittacidae conservation; threatened species; unsustainable use of wildlife
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sánchez-Mercado, A.; Blanco, O.; Sucre-Smith, B.; Briceño-Linares, J.M.; Peláez, C.; Rodríguez, J.P. Using Peoples’ Perceptions to Improve Conservation Programs: The Yellow-Shouldered Amazon in Venezuela. Diversity 2020, 12, 342.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop