Next Article in Journal
Spatial and Temporal Trends of Burnt Area in Angola: Implications for Natural Vegetation and Protected Area Management
Previous Article in Journal
Perceptions of Similarity Can Mislead Provenancing Strategies—An Example from Five Co-Distributed Acacia Species
Article

Current and Future Distribution of Five Timber Forest Species in Amazonas, Northeast Peru: Contributions towards a Restoration Strategy

1
Instituto de Investigación para el Desarrollo Sustentable de Ceja de Selva, Universidad Nacional Toribio Rodríguez de Mendoza de Amazonas, Chachapoyas 01001, Peru
2
Neotropical Montology Collaboratory, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
3
Departamento de Ingeniería Ambiental, Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina, La Molina 15012, Peru
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(8), 305; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12080305
Received: 18 June 2020 / Revised: 21 July 2020 / Accepted: 22 July 2020 / Published: 8 August 2020
Forest and land degradation is a serious problem worldwide and the Peruvian National Map of Degraded Areas indicates that 13.78% (177,592.82 km2) of the country’s territory is degraded. Forest plantations can be a restoration strategy, while conserving economically important species affected by climate change and providing forestry material for markets. This study modelled the species distribution under current conditions and climate change scenarios of five Timber Forest Species (TFS) in the Amazonas Department, northeastern Peru. Modelling was conducted with Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) using 26 environmental variables. Of the total distribution under current conditions of Cedrelinga cateniformis, Ceiba pentandra, Apuleia leiocarpa, Cariniana decandra and Cedrela montana, 34.64% (2985.51 km2), 37.96% (2155.86 km2), 35.34% (2132.57 km2), 33.30% (1848.51 km2), and 35.81% (6125.44 km2), respectively, correspond to degraded areas and, therefore, there is restoration potential with these species. By 2050 and 2070, all TFS are projected to change their distribution compared to their current ranges, regardless of whether it will be an expansion and/or a contraction. Consequently, this methodology is intended to guide the economic and ecological success of forest plantations in reducing areas degraded by deforestation or similar activities. View Full-Text
Keywords: deforestation; forest restoration; climate change; MaxEnt; productive conservation; species distribution modelling deforestation; forest restoration; climate change; MaxEnt; productive conservation; species distribution modelling
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Rojas Briceño, N.B.; Cotrina Sánchez, D.A.; Barboza Castillo, E.; Barrena Gurbillón, M.Á.; Sarmiento, F.O.; Sotomayor, D.A.; Oliva, M.; Salas López, R. Current and Future Distribution of Five Timber Forest Species in Amazonas, Northeast Peru: Contributions towards a Restoration Strategy. Diversity 2020, 12, 305. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12080305

AMA Style

Rojas Briceño NB, Cotrina Sánchez DA, Barboza Castillo E, Barrena Gurbillón MÁ, Sarmiento FO, Sotomayor DA, Oliva M, Salas López R. Current and Future Distribution of Five Timber Forest Species in Amazonas, Northeast Peru: Contributions towards a Restoration Strategy. Diversity. 2020; 12(8):305. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12080305

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rojas Briceño, Nilton B., Dany A. Cotrina Sánchez, Elgar Barboza Castillo, Miguel Á. Barrena Gurbillón, Fausto O. Sarmiento, Diego A. Sotomayor, Manuel Oliva, and Rolando Salas López. 2020. "Current and Future Distribution of Five Timber Forest Species in Amazonas, Northeast Peru: Contributions towards a Restoration Strategy" Diversity 12, no. 8: 305. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12080305

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop