Next Article in Journal
A Common Approach to the Conservation of Threatened Island Vascular Plants: First Results in the Mediterranean Basin
Next Article in Special Issue
Drivers of Foliar Fungal Endophytic Communities of Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata) in the Southeast United States
Previous Article in Journal
Revised Calculation of Kalinowski’s Ancestral and New Inbreeding Coefficients
Previous Article in Special Issue
Identifying Mechanisms for Successful Ecological Restoration with Salvaged Topsoil in Coastal Sage Scrub Communities
Open AccessArticle

In Nitrate-Rich Soil, Fallopia x bohemica Modifies Functioning of N Cycle Compared to Native Monocultures

1
Univ Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, INRAE, UMR5557 LEM, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France
2
Univ Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, ENTPE, UMR5023 LEHNA, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Equally contributing authors.
Current address: Isara, AGE-AGroecology and Environment Research Unit, 23 rue Jean Baldassini, 69364 Lyon, CEDEX 07, France.
Diversity 2020, 12(4), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12040156
Received: 31 January 2020 / Revised: 14 April 2020 / Accepted: 15 April 2020 / Published: 17 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Interactions with Invasive Plant Species)
The effects of invasive species at the ecosystem level remain an important component required to assess their impacts. Here, we conducted an experimental study with labeled nitrogen in two types of soil (low and high nitrate conditions), investigating the effects of (1) the presence of Fallopia x bohemica on the traits of three native species (Humulus lupulus, Sambucus ebulus, and Urtica dioica) and (2) interspecific competition (monoculture of the invasive species, monoculture of the native species, and a mixture of invasive/native species) on nitrification, denitrification, and related microbial communities (i.e., functional gene abundances). We found that the species with the higher nitrate assimilation rate (U. dioica) was affected differently by the invasive species, with no effect or even an increase in aboveground biomass and number of leaves. F. x bohemica also decreased denitrification, but only in the soil with high nitrate concentrations. The impacts of the invasive species on nitrification and soil microorganisms depended on the native species and the soil type, suggesting that competition for nitrogen between plants and between plants and microorganisms is highly dependent on species traits and environmental conditions. This research highlights that studies looking at the impacts of invasive species on ecosystems should consider the plant–soil–microorganism complex as a whole. View Full-Text
Keywords: nitrogen (N) cycle; labeled-N; isotopes; plant-soil competition for soil N; invasive and native species; nitrification; denitrification; abundances of functional genes nitrogen (N) cycle; labeled-N; isotopes; plant-soil competition for soil N; invasive and native species; nitrification; denitrification; abundances of functional genes
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Cantarel, A.A.M.; Rouifed, S.; Simon, L.; Bourg, J.; Gervaix, J.; Blazère, L.; Poussineau, S.; Creuzé des Châtelliers, C.; Piola, F. In Nitrate-Rich Soil, Fallopia x bohemica Modifies Functioning of N Cycle Compared to Native Monocultures. Diversity 2020, 12, 156.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop