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Open AccessArticle

High Genetic Diversity among Breeding Red-Backed Shrikes Lanius collurio in the Western Palearctic

1
Institute of Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology, Department Biology, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
2
Institute of Avian Research “Vogelwarte Helgoland”, An der Vogelwarte 21, Wilhelmshaven 26386, Germany
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2019, 11(3), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11030031
Received: 12 February 2019 / Accepted: 21 February 2019 / Published: 26 February 2019
Revealing the genetic population structure in abundant avian species is crucial for understanding speciation, conservation, and evolutionary history. The Red-backed Shrike Lanius collurio, an iconic songbird renowned for impaling its prey, is widely distributed as a breeder across much of Europe, Asia Minor and western Asia. However, in recent decades, many populations have declined significantly, as a result of habitat loss, hunting along migration routes, decrease of arthropod food, and climate change e.g., severe droughts in Africa. Within this context, gene flow among different breeding populations becomes critical to ensure the survival of the species, but we still lack an overview on the genetic diversity of the species. In this paper, we analyzed the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (mtDNA) and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (mtDNA) of 132 breeding Red-backed Shrikes from across the entire breeding range to address this knowledge gap. Our results revealed consistent genetic diversity and 76 haplotypes among the Eurasian populations. Birds are clustered in two major groups, with no clear geographical separation, as a direct consequence of Pleistocene glaciations and apparent lineage mixing in refugia. This has led to genetic panmixia. View Full-Text
Keywords: mitochondrial DNA; phylogeography; Lanius collurio; Red-backed Shrike; Western Palearctic; population; genetic diversity; panmixia mitochondrial DNA; phylogeography; Lanius collurio; Red-backed Shrike; Western Palearctic; population; genetic diversity; panmixia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pârâu, L.G.; Frias-Soler, R.C.; Wink, M. High Genetic Diversity among Breeding Red-Backed Shrikes Lanius collurio in the Western Palearctic. Diversity 2019, 11, 31. https://doi.org/10.3390/d11030031

AMA Style

Pârâu LG, Frias-Soler RC, Wink M. High Genetic Diversity among Breeding Red-Backed Shrikes Lanius collurio in the Western Palearctic. Diversity. 2019; 11(3):31. https://doi.org/10.3390/d11030031

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pârâu, Liviu G.; Frias-Soler, Roberto C.; Wink, Michael. 2019. "High Genetic Diversity among Breeding Red-Backed Shrikes Lanius collurio in the Western Palearctic" Diversity 11, no. 3: 31. https://doi.org/10.3390/d11030031

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