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Open AccessArticle

Impact of Land Use on Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Temperate Pine and Indigenous Forest Soils

Food Security and Safety, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X2046, Mmabatho 2735, South Africa
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Diversity 2019, 11(11), 217; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11110217
Received: 6 October 2019 / Revised: 1 November 2019 / Accepted: 8 November 2019 / Published: 14 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Microbial Diversity and Culture Collections)
Soil microbial communities are an important part of ecosystems that possess the capability to improve ecosystem services; however, several aspects of the ecology of forest soil bacterial communities are still unknown. Here, we investigated the impact of land-use change on soil bacterial communities and the soil characteristics. High-throughput sequencing was used to ascertain the bacterial diversity and canonical correspondence analysis was used to determine relationships between the bacterial communities and environmental variables. Our results show spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of the microbial communities and significant relationships between the microbes and soil characteristics (axis 1 of the canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) plot explained 64.55% of the total variance while axis 2 described 24.49%). Knowledge of this is essential as it has direct consequences for the functioning of the soil ecosystem. View Full-Text
Keywords: 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing; forest management; metabolic potentials; microbial ecology; ribosomal data project; South Africa 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing; forest management; metabolic potentials; microbial ecology; ribosomal data project; South Africa
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Amoo, A.E.; Babalola, O.O. Impact of Land Use on Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Temperate Pine and Indigenous Forest Soils. Diversity 2019, 11, 217.

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