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Diversity 2018, 10(4), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10040109

Recovering Plant Data for Guinea-Bissau: Implications for Biodiversity Knowledge of West Africa

1
Linking Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food (LEAF), Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal
2
Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes (cE3c), Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisbon, Portugal
3
International Center for Tropical Botany, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA
4
Kushlan Tropical Science Institute, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables, FL 33156, USA
5
Centre for Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, 1349-006 Lisbon, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 September 2018 / Revised: 29 September 2018 / Accepted: 1 October 2018 / Published: 6 October 2018
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Abstract

The rich plant diversity that characterizes the West African Region and the inherent knowledge of their flora and vegetation has been the backbone of scientific explorations during the past centuries. The evolution of botanical knowledge on Guinea-Bissau, throughout the 16th and 20th centuries is reviewed. We present and discuss floristic data collected by scientific expeditions between the mid-1700s to 1974, when the Portuguese colonial period ended. Expeditions undertaken by French naturalists provided some of the earliest plant collections. A list of herbarium specimens collected by the French naturalist Jardin, in the Bijagós Islands in ca. 1847–1858 is presented here for the first time, while in the late 1800s some Portuguese naturalists also explored Guinea-Bissau. During the colonial period (1915–1974), Gomes e Sousa published the first comprehensive study of the territory’s flora while Espírito Santo assembled the largest plant collection. Our review applies a multi-disciplinary perspective to fill important lacuna regarding biodiversity knowledge of this under-researched West African country. It constitutes the first study tracing the long term evolution of knowledge on Guinea Bissau's plant diversity, which provides the basis for understanding trends and research priorities, in particular in conservation and botanical fields. View Full-Text
Keywords: plant diversity; botanical history; West Africa; scientific collections; naturalists; African Flora plant diversity; botanical history; West Africa; scientific collections; naturalists; African Flora
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Romeiras, M.M.; Duarte, M.C.; Francisco-Ortega, J.; Catarino, L.; Havik, P. Recovering Plant Data for Guinea-Bissau: Implications for Biodiversity Knowledge of West Africa. Diversity 2018, 10, 109.

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