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Review

Does Bisphenol A Confer Risk of Neurodevelopmental Disorders? What We Have Learned from Developmental Neurotoxicity Studies in Animal Models

1
Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
2
Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Sacramento, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Nicolas Chevalier and Charlotte Hinault-Boyer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(5), 2894; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23052894
Received: 29 January 2022 / Revised: 2 March 2022 / Accepted: 5 March 2022 / Published: 7 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Endocrine Disruptors)
Substantial evidence indicates that bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous environmental chemical used in the synthesis of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, can impair brain development. Clinical and epidemiological studies exploring potential connections between BPA and neurodevelopmental disorders in humans have repeatedly identified correlations between early BPA exposure and developmental disorders, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder. Investigations using invertebrate and vertebrate animal models have revealed that developmental exposure to BPA can impair multiple aspects of neuronal development, including neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation, synapse formation, and synaptic plasticity—neuronal phenotypes that are thought to underpin the fundamental changes in behavior-associated neurodevelopmental disorders. Consistent with neuronal phenotypes caused by BPA, behavioral analyses of BPA-treated animals have shown significant impacts on behavioral endophenotypes related to neurodevelopmental disorders, including altered locomotor activity, learning and memory deficits, and anxiety-like behavior. To contextualize the correlations between BPA and neurodevelopmental disorders in humans, this review summarizes the current literature on the developmental neurotoxicity of BPA in laboratory animals with an emphasis on neuronal phenotypes, molecular mechanisms, and behavioral outcomes. The collective works described here predominantly support the notion that gestational exposure to BPA should be regarded as a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders. View Full-Text
Keywords: bisphenol A; endocrine disruptors; neurodevelopmental disorder; neural stem cell development; synaptogenesis; synaptic plasticity; behavior bisphenol A; endocrine disruptors; neurodevelopmental disorder; neural stem cell development; synaptogenesis; synaptic plasticity; behavior
MDPI and ACS Style

Welch, C.; Mulligan, K. Does Bisphenol A Confer Risk of Neurodevelopmental Disorders? What We Have Learned from Developmental Neurotoxicity Studies in Animal Models. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23, 2894. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23052894

AMA Style

Welch C, Mulligan K. Does Bisphenol A Confer Risk of Neurodevelopmental Disorders? What We Have Learned from Developmental Neurotoxicity Studies in Animal Models. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2022; 23(5):2894. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23052894

Chicago/Turabian Style

Welch, Chloe, and Kimberly Mulligan. 2022. "Does Bisphenol A Confer Risk of Neurodevelopmental Disorders? What We Have Learned from Developmental Neurotoxicity Studies in Animal Models" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 23, no. 5: 2894. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23052894

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