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Article

Synchrotron-Based Fourier-Transform Infrared Micro-Spectroscopy (SR-FTIRM) Fingerprint of the Small Anionic Molecule Cobaltabis(dicarbollide) Uptake in Glioma Stem Cells

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Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC, Campus Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain
2
Laboratory of Experimental Oncological Neurosurgery, Neurosurgery Service, Hospital Clinic de Barcelona—FCRB, 08036 Barcelona, Spain
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Ionizing Radiation Research Group (GRRI), Physics Department, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Avinguda de l’Eix Central, Edifici C. Campus de la UAB, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
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ALBA-CELLS Synchrotron, MIRAS Beamline, Carrer de la Llum 2-26, 08290 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
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Laboratory of Pharmacology and Brain Pathology, IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, 20089 Rozzano, Italy
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Apoptosis and Cancer Unit, Department of Physiological Sciences, IDIBELL, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universitat de Barcelona, 08907 L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
The authors contributed equally to the work.
Academic Editor: Maria Alexandra Brito
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(18), 9937; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22189937
Received: 30 July 2021 / Revised: 7 September 2021 / Accepted: 10 September 2021 / Published: 14 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Neuro-Oncology)
The anionic cobaltabis (dicarbollide) [3,3′-Co(1,2-C2B9H11)2], [o-COSAN], is the most studied icosahedral metallacarborane. The sodium salts of [o-COSAN] could be an ideal candidate for the anti-cancer treatment Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) as it possesses the ability to readily cross biological membranes thereby producing cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. BNCT is a cancer therapy based on the potential of 10B atoms to produce α particles that cross tissues in which the 10B is accumulated without damaging the surrounding healthy tissues, after being irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons. Since Na[o-COSAN] displays a strong and characteristic ν(B-H) frequency in the infrared range 2.600–2.500 cm−1, we studied the uptake of Na[o-COSAN] followed by its interaction with biomolecules and its cellular biodistribution in two different glioma initiating cells (GICs), mesenchymal and proneural respectively, by using Synchrotron Radiation-Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) micro-spectroscopy (SR-FTIRM) facilities at the MIRAS Beamline of ALBA synchrotron light source. The spectroscopic data analysis from the bands in the regions of DNA, proteins, and lipids permitted to suggest that after its cellular uptake, Na[o-COSAN] strongly interacts with DNA strings, modifies proteins secondary structure and also leads to lipid saturation. The mapping suggests the nuclear localization of [o-COSAN], which according to reported Monte Carlo simulations may result in a more efficient cell-killing effect compared to that in a uniform distribution within the entire cell. In conclusion, we show pieces of evidence that at low doses, [o-COSAN] translocates GIC cells’ membranes and it alters the physiology of the cells, suggesting that Na[o-COSAN] is a promising agent to BNCT for glioblastoma cells. View Full-Text
Keywords: boron neutron capture therapy; cobaltabis(dicarbollide); DNA interactions; glioblastoma; glioma initiating cells; inorganic small molecules; lipid saturation; SR-FTIRM boron neutron capture therapy; cobaltabis(dicarbollide); DNA interactions; glioblastoma; glioma initiating cells; inorganic small molecules; lipid saturation; SR-FTIRM
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nuez-Martínez, M.; Pedrosa, L.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Yousef, I.; Diao, D.; Teixidor, F.; Stanzani, E.; Martínez-Soler, F.; Tortosa, A.; Sierra, À.; Gonzalez, J.J.; Viñas, C. Synchrotron-Based Fourier-Transform Infrared Micro-Spectroscopy (SR-FTIRM) Fingerprint of the Small Anionic Molecule Cobaltabis(dicarbollide) Uptake in Glioma Stem Cells. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 9937. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22189937

AMA Style

Nuez-Martínez M, Pedrosa L, Martinez-Rovira I, Yousef I, Diao D, Teixidor F, Stanzani E, Martínez-Soler F, Tortosa A, Sierra À, Gonzalez JJ, Viñas C. Synchrotron-Based Fourier-Transform Infrared Micro-Spectroscopy (SR-FTIRM) Fingerprint of the Small Anionic Molecule Cobaltabis(dicarbollide) Uptake in Glioma Stem Cells. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(18):9937. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22189937

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nuez-Martínez, Miquel, Leire Pedrosa, Immaculada Martinez-Rovira, Ibraheem Yousef, Diouldé Diao, Francesc Teixidor, Elisabetta Stanzani, Fina Martínez-Soler, Avelina Tortosa, Àngels Sierra, José J. Gonzalez, and Clara Viñas. 2021. "Synchrotron-Based Fourier-Transform Infrared Micro-Spectroscopy (SR-FTIRM) Fingerprint of the Small Anionic Molecule Cobaltabis(dicarbollide) Uptake in Glioma Stem Cells" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 18: 9937. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22189937

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