Next Article in Journal
Roles of Lipids in the Permeability Barriers of Skin and Oral Mucosa
Previous Article in Journal
Recombinant γY278H Fibrinogen Showed Normal Secretion from CHO Cells, but a Corresponding Heterozygous Patient Showed Hypofibrinogenemia
Article

Artificial Sweeteners Negatively Regulate Pathogenic Characteristics of Two Model Gut Bacteria, E. coli and E. faecalis

1
Biomedical Research Group, School of Life Sciences, East Road, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK
2
School of Life Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Miguel Gueimonde
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(10), 5228; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22105228
Received: 19 April 2021 / Revised: 11 May 2021 / Accepted: 13 May 2021 / Published: 15 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Microbiology)
Artificial sweeteners (AS) are synthetic sugar substitutes that are commonly consumed in the diet. Recent studies have indicated considerable health risks which links the consumption of AS with metabolic derangements and gut microbiota perturbations. Despite these studies, there is still limited data on how AS impacts the commensal microbiota to cause pathogenicity. The present study sought to investigate the role of commonly consumed AS on gut bacterial pathogenicity and gut epithelium-microbiota interactions, using models of microbiota (Escherichia coli NCTC10418 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC19433) and the intestinal epithelium (Caco-2 cells). Model gut bacteria were exposed to different concentrations of the AS saccharin, sucralose, and aspartame, and their pathogenicity and changes in interactions with Caco-2 cells were measured using in vitro studies. Findings show that sweeteners differentially increase the ability of bacteria to form a biofilm. Co-culture with human intestinal epithelial cells shows an increase in the ability of model gut bacteria to adhere to, invade and kill the host epithelium. The pan-sweet taste inhibitor, zinc sulphate, effectively blocked these negative impacts. Since AS consumption in the diet continues to increase, understanding how this food additive affects gut microbiota and how these damaging effects can be ameliorated is vital. View Full-Text
Keywords: artificial sweeteners; microbiota; in vitro models; gut bacteria artificial sweeteners; microbiota; in vitro models; gut bacteria
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Shil, A.; Chichger, H. Artificial Sweeteners Negatively Regulate Pathogenic Characteristics of Two Model Gut Bacteria, E. coli and E. faecalis. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 5228. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22105228

AMA Style

Shil A, Chichger H. Artificial Sweeteners Negatively Regulate Pathogenic Characteristics of Two Model Gut Bacteria, E. coli and E. faecalis. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(10):5228. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22105228

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shil, Aparna, and Havovi Chichger. 2021. "Artificial Sweeteners Negatively Regulate Pathogenic Characteristics of Two Model Gut Bacteria, E. coli and E. faecalis" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 10: 5228. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22105228

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop