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Article

Season Affects Yield and Metabolic Profiles of Rice (Oryza sativa) under High Night Temperature Stress in the Field

1
Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
2
International Rice Research Institute, Metro Manila 1301, Philippines
3
Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science, Beijing 100081, China
4
Department of Agronomy, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Present address: Department of Biological Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(9), 3187; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093187
Received: 6 March 2020 / Revised: 23 April 2020 / Accepted: 29 April 2020 / Published: 30 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Research in Rice: Agronomically Important Traits)
Rice (Oryza sativa) is the main food source for more than 3.5 billion people in the world. Global climate change is having a strong negative effect on rice production. One of the climatic factors impacting rice yield is asymmetric warming, i.e., the stronger increase in nighttime as compared to daytime temperatures. Little is known of the metabolic responses of rice to high night temperature (HNT) in the field. Eight rice cultivars with contrasting HNT sensitivity were grown in the field during the wet (WS) and dry season (DS) in the Philippines. Plant height, 1000-grain weight and harvest index were influenced by HNT in both seasons, while total grain yield was only consistently reduced in the WS. Metabolite composition was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). HNT effects were more pronounced in panicles than in flag leaves. A decreased abundance of sugar phosphates and sucrose, and a higher abundance of monosaccharides in panicles indicated impaired glycolysis and higher respiration-driven carbon losses in response to HNT in the WS. Higher amounts of alanine and cyano-alanine in panicles grown in the DS compared to in those grown in the WS point to an improved N-assimilation and more effective detoxification of cyanide, contributing to the smaller impact of HNT on grain yield in the DS. View Full-Text
Keywords: high night temperature; rice; grain yield; wet season; dry season; metabolomics high night temperature; rice; grain yield; wet season; dry season; metabolomics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schaarschmidt, S.; Lawas, L.M.F.; Glaubitz, U.; Li, X.; Erban, A.; Kopka, J.; Jagadish, S.V.K.; Hincha, D.K.; Zuther, E. Season Affects Yield and Metabolic Profiles of Rice (Oryza sativa) under High Night Temperature Stress in the Field. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 3187. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093187

AMA Style

Schaarschmidt S, Lawas LMF, Glaubitz U, Li X, Erban A, Kopka J, Jagadish SVK, Hincha DK, Zuther E. Season Affects Yield and Metabolic Profiles of Rice (Oryza sativa) under High Night Temperature Stress in the Field. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(9):3187. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093187

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schaarschmidt, Stephanie, Lovely M.F. Lawas, Ulrike Glaubitz, Xia Li, Alexander Erban, Joachim Kopka, S. V.K. Jagadish, Dirk K. Hincha, and Ellen Zuther. 2020. "Season Affects Yield and Metabolic Profiles of Rice (Oryza sativa) under High Night Temperature Stress in the Field" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 9: 3187. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093187

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