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Open AccessReview

Recent Advances in Psoriasis Research; the Clue to Mysterious Relation to Gut Microbiome

by Mayumi Komine 1,2
1
Department of Dermatology, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimotsuke, Tochigi 329-0498, Japan
2
Department of Biochemistry, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimotsuke, Tochigi 329-0498, Japan
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(7), 2582; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21072582
Received: 29 February 2020 / Revised: 1 April 2020 / Accepted: 1 April 2020 / Published: 8 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Therapy and Prevention of Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis)
Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory cutaneous disease, characterized by activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells, myeloid dendritic cells, Th17 cells, and hyperproliferating keratinocytes. Recent studies revealed skin-resident cells have pivotal roles in developing psoriatic skin lesions. The balance in effector T cells and regulatory T cells is disturbed, leading Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells to produce proinflammatory IL-17. Not only acquired but also innate immunity is important in psoriasis pathogenesis, especially in triggering the disease. Group 3 innate lymphoid cell are considered one of IL-17-producing cells in psoriasis. Short chain fatty acids produced by gut microbiota stabilize expression of Foxp3 in regulatory T cells, thereby stabilizing their function. The composition of gut microbiota influences the systemic inflammatory status, and associations been shown with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, psychomotor diseases, and other systemic inflammatory disorders. Psoriasis has been shown to frequently comorbid with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, psychomotor disease and obesity, and recent report suggested the similar abnormality in gut microbiota as the above comorbid diseases. However, the precise mechanism and relation between psoriasis pathogenesis and gut microbiota needs further investigation. This review introduces the recent advances in psoriasis research and tries to provide clues to solve the mysterious relation of psoriasis and gut microbiota. View Full-Text
Keywords: psoriasis; tissue resident cells; innate lymphoid cells; regulatory T cells; Foxp3; gut microbiome; systemic inflammation psoriasis; tissue resident cells; innate lymphoid cells; regulatory T cells; Foxp3; gut microbiome; systemic inflammation
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Komine, M. Recent Advances in Psoriasis Research; the Clue to Mysterious Relation to Gut Microbiome. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 2582.

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