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Minimal Residual Disease Detection in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

1
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, University of Southern California, 4650 Sunset Boulevard, MS #57, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA
2
Department of Pediatrics Patient Care, Division of Pediatrics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(3), 1054; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21031054
Received: 19 November 2019 / Revised: 30 January 2020 / Accepted: 3 February 2020 / Published: 5 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Research on Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)
Minimal residual disease (MRD) refers to a chemotherapy/radiotherapy-surviving leukemia cell population that gives rise to relapse of the disease. The detection of MRD is critical for predicting the outcome and for selecting the intensity of further treatment strategies. The development of various new diagnostic platforms, including next-generation sequencing (NGS), has introduced significant advances in the sensitivity of MRD diagnostics. Here, we review current methods to diagnose MRD through phenotypic marker patterns or differential gene patterns through analysis by flow cytometry (FCM), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR), reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or NGS. Future advances in clinical procedures will be molded by practical feasibility and patient needs regarding greater diagnostic sensitivity. View Full-Text
Keywords: minimal residual disease; acute lymphoblastic leukemia; B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia; T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia; flow cytometry; polymerase chain reaction; next-generation sequencing minimal residual disease; acute lymphoblastic leukemia; B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia; T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia; flow cytometry; polymerase chain reaction; next-generation sequencing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kruse, A.; Abdel-Azim, N.; Kim, H.N.; Ruan, Y.; Phan, V.; Ogana, H.; Wang, W.; Lee, R.; Gang, E.J.; Khazal, S.; Kim, Y.-M. Minimal Residual Disease Detection in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 1054. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21031054

AMA Style

Kruse A, Abdel-Azim N, Kim HN, Ruan Y, Phan V, Ogana H, Wang W, Lee R, Gang EJ, Khazal S, Kim Y-M. Minimal Residual Disease Detection in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(3):1054. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21031054

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kruse, Aaron; Abdel-Azim, Nour; Kim, Hye Na; Ruan, Yongsheng; Phan, Valerie; Ogana, Heather; Wang, William; Lee, Rachel; Gang, Eun Ji; Khazal, Sajad; Kim, Yong-Mi. 2020. "Minimal Residual Disease Detection in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 21, no. 3: 1054. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21031054

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