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Article

Reducing Flower Competition for Assimilates by Half Results in Higher Yield of Fagopyrum esculentum

1
Department of Plant Physiology, Faculty of Agriculture and Economics, University of Agriculture, Podłużna 3, 30-239 Kraków, Poland
2
Department of Plant Cytology and Embryology, Institute of Botany, Faculty of Biology, Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Gronostajowa 9, 30-387 Kraków, Poland
3
F. Górski Institute of Plant Physiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Niezapominajek 21, 30-239 Kraków, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(23), 8953; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21238953
Received: 22 October 2020 / Revised: 15 November 2020 / Accepted: 23 November 2020 / Published: 25 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Stress and Plants)
Despite abundant flowering throughout the season, common buckwheat develops a very low number of kernels probably due to competition for assimilates. We hypothesized that plants with a shorter flowering period may give a higher seed yield. To verify the hypothesis, we studied nutrient stress in vitro and in planta and analyzed different embryological and yield parameters, including hormone profile in the flowers. In vitro cultivated flowers on media with strongly reduced nutrient content demonstrated a drastic increase in degenerated embryo sacs. In in planta experiments, where 50% or 75% of flowers or all lateral ramifications were removed, the reduction of the flower competition by half turned out to be the most promising treatment for improving yield. This treatment increased the frequency of properly developed embryo sacs, the average number of mature seeds per plant, and their mass. Strong seed compensation under 50% inflorescence removal could result from increased production of salicylic and jasmonic acid that both favor more effective pollinator attraction. Plants in single-shoot cultivation finished their vegetation earlier, and they demonstrated greater single seed mass per plant than in control. This result suggests that plants of common buckwheat with shorter blooming period could deliver higher seed yield. View Full-Text
Keywords: common buckwheat; embryo sacs; nutrient stress; phytohormones; pollen grains; yield parameters common buckwheat; embryo sacs; nutrient stress; phytohormones; pollen grains; yield parameters
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hornyák, M.; Słomka, A.; Sychta, K.; Dziurka, M.; Kopeć, P.; Pastuszak, J.; Szczerba, A.; Płażek, A. Reducing Flower Competition for Assimilates by Half Results in Higher Yield of Fagopyrum esculentum. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 8953. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21238953

AMA Style

Hornyák M, Słomka A, Sychta K, Dziurka M, Kopeć P, Pastuszak J, Szczerba A, Płażek A. Reducing Flower Competition for Assimilates by Half Results in Higher Yield of Fagopyrum esculentum. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(23):8953. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21238953

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hornyák, Marta, Aneta Słomka, Klaudia Sychta, Michał Dziurka, Przemysław Kopeć, Jakub Pastuszak, Anna Szczerba, and Agnieszka Płażek. 2020. "Reducing Flower Competition for Assimilates by Half Results in Higher Yield of Fagopyrum esculentum" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 23: 8953. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21238953

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