Next Article in Journal
High-Resolution Respirometry Reveals MPP+ Mitochondrial Toxicity Mechanism in a Cellular Model of Parkinson’s Disease
Previous Article in Journal
rad21 Is Involved in Corneal Stroma Development by Regulating Neural Crest Migration
Open AccessArticle

Safety and Molecular-Toxicological Implications of Cannabidiol-Rich Cannabis Extract and Methylsulfonylmethane Co-Administration

1
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
2
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
3
Department of Biochemistry, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
4
Center for Dietary Supplements Research, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
5
Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
6
National Center for Natural Products Research, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 38677, USA
7
ElSohly Laboratories, Inc. (ELI), Oxford, MS 38655, USA
8
Department of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, School of Pharmacy, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 38677, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(20), 7808; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21207808
Received: 28 September 2020 / Revised: 15 October 2020 / Accepted: 18 October 2020 / Published: 21 October 2020
Cannabidiol (CBD) is a biologically active, non-psychotropic component of Cannabis sativa whose popularity has grown exponentially in recent years. Besides a wealth of potential health benefits, ingestion of CBD poses risks for a number of side effects, of which hepatotoxicity and CBD/herb-drug interactions are of particular concern. Here, we investigated the interaction potential between the cannabidiol-rich cannabis extract (CRCE) and methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), a popular dietary supplement, in the mouse model. For this purpose, 8-week-old male C57BL6/J mice received MSM-containing water (80 mg/100 mL) ad libitum for 17 days. During the last three days of treatment, mice received three doses of CRCE administered in sesame oil via oral gavage (123 mg/kg/day). Administration of MSM alone did not result in any evidence of liver toxicity and did not induce expression of mouse cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. Administration of CRCE did produce significant (p < 0.05) increases in Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a4, Cyp3a11, Cyp2c65, and Cyp2c66 messenger RNA, however, this effect was not amplified by MSM/CRCE co-treatment. Similarly, no evidence of liver toxicity was observed in MSM/CRCE dosed mice. In conclusion, short-term MSM/CRCE co-administration did not demonstrate any evidence of hepatotoxicity in the mouse model. View Full-Text
Keywords: cannabidiol; cytochrome P450; dietary supplements; hemp extract; hepatotoxicity; herb-drug interaction; methylsulfonylmethane; safety; toxicity cannabidiol; cytochrome P450; dietary supplements; hemp extract; hepatotoxicity; herb-drug interaction; methylsulfonylmethane; safety; toxicity
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Kutanzi, K.R.; Ewing, L.E.; Skinner, C.M.; Quick, C.M.; Kennon-McGill, S.; McGill, M.R.; Walker, L.A.; ElSohly, M.A.; Gurley, B.J.; Koturbash, I. Safety and Molecular-Toxicological Implications of Cannabidiol-Rich Cannabis Extract and Methylsulfonylmethane Co-Administration. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 7808.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop