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Gut-Pancreas-Liver Axis as a Target for Treatment of NAFLD/NASH

1
Liver Injury and Transplant Unit, Ospedali Riuniti Ancona, 60020 Ancona, Italy
2
Obesity Center, Polytechnic University of Marche, 60121 Ancona, Italy
3
Cardiometabolic Risk Unit, Institute of Clinical Physiology, CNR, 56124 Pisa, Italy
4
Institute of Life Sciences, Sant′Anna School of Advanced Studies, 56127 Pisa, Italy
5
APDP Diabetes Portugal, Education and Research Center (APDP-ERC), 1250-189 Lisbon, Portugal
6
Department of Gastroenterology, Polytechnic University of Marche, 60121 Ancona, Italy
7
CEDOC, NOVA Medical School/Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 1150-082 Lisboa, Portugal
8
Department of Medical Sciences, Institute of Biomedicine-iBiMED, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(16), 5820; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21165820
Received: 1 July 2020 / Revised: 4 August 2020 / Accepted: 9 August 2020 / Published: 13 August 2020
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common form of chronic liver disease worldwide. Due to its association with obesity and diabetes and the fall in hepatitis C virus morbidity, cirrhosis in NAFLD is becoming the most frequent indication to liver transplantation, but the pathogenetic mechanisms are still not completely understood. The so-called gut-liver axis has gained enormous interest when data showed that its alteration can lead to NAFLD development and might favor the occurrence of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Moreover, several therapeutic approaches targeting the gut-pancreas-liver axis, e.g., incretins, showed promising results in NASH treatment. In this review, we describe the role of incretin hormones in NAFLD/NASH pathogenesis and treatment and how metagenomic/metabolomic alterations in the gut microbiota can lead to NASH in the presence of gut barrier modifications favoring the passage of bacteria or bacterial products in the portal circulation, i.e., bacterial translocation. View Full-Text
Keywords: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; type-2 diabetes; gut-pancreas-liver axis; incretins; lipid metabolism; glucose metabolism non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; type-2 diabetes; gut-pancreas-liver axis; incretins; lipid metabolism; glucose metabolism
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MDPI and ACS Style

Svegliati-Baroni, G.; Patrício, B.; Lioci, G.; Macedo, M.P.; Gastaldelli, A. Gut-Pancreas-Liver Axis as a Target for Treatment of NAFLD/NASH. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 5820.

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