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Article

Physiological and Metabolic Effects of Yellow Mangosteen (Garcinia dulcis) Rind in Rats with Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome

1
Functional Foods Research Group, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, QLD 4350, Australia
2
School of Health and Wellbeing, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, QLD 4350, Australia
3
Southern Cross Plant Science, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480, Australia
4
Centre for Marine Science and Innovation & School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(1), 272; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21010272
Received: 14 November 2019 / Revised: 6 December 2019 / Accepted: 27 December 2019 / Published: 31 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods for Obesity—from Mechanisms to Treatments)
Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. This study has investigated the responses to rind of yellow mangosteen (Garcinia dulcis), usually discarded as waste, in a rat model of human metabolic syndrome. The rind contains higher concentrations of phytochemicals (such as garcinol, morelloflavone and citric acid) than the pulp. Male Wistar rats aged 8–9 weeks were fed either corn starch diet or high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet for 16 weeks, which were supplemented with 5% freeze-dried G. dulcis fruit rind powder during the last 8 weeks. We characterised metabolic, cardiovascular, liver and gut microbiota parameters. High-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats developed abdominal obesity, hypertension, increased left ventricular diastolic stiffness, decreased glucose tolerance, fatty liver and reduced Bacteroidia with increased Clostridia in the colonic microbiota. G. dulcis fruit rind powder attenuated these changes, improved cardiovascular and liver structure and function, and attenuated changes in colonic microbiota. G. dulcis fruit rind powder may be effective in metabolic syndrome by appetite suppression, inhibition of inflammatory processes and increased fat metabolism, possibly related to changes in the colonic microbiota. Hence, we propose the use of G. dulcis fruit rind as a functional food to ameliorate symptoms of metabolic syndrome. View Full-Text
Keywords: metabolic syndrome; Garcinia dulcis; citric acid; garcinol; morelloflavone; microbiota metabolic syndrome; Garcinia dulcis; citric acid; garcinol; morelloflavone; microbiota
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MDPI and ACS Style

John, O.D.; Mouatt, P.; Majzoub, M.E.; Thomas, T.; Panchal, S.K.; Brown, L. Physiological and Metabolic Effects of Yellow Mangosteen (Garcinia dulcis) Rind in Rats with Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 272. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21010272

AMA Style

John OD, Mouatt P, Majzoub ME, Thomas T, Panchal SK, Brown L. Physiological and Metabolic Effects of Yellow Mangosteen (Garcinia dulcis) Rind in Rats with Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(1):272. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21010272

Chicago/Turabian Style

John, Oliver D., Peter Mouatt, Marwan E. Majzoub, Torsten Thomas, Sunil K. Panchal, and Lindsay Brown. 2020. "Physiological and Metabolic Effects of Yellow Mangosteen (Garcinia dulcis) Rind in Rats with Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 1: 272. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21010272

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