Next Article in Journal
Ischemic Postconditioning Reduces Reperfusion Arrhythmias by Adenosine Receptors and Protein Kinase C Activation but Is Independent of KATP Channels or Connexin 43
Next Article in Special Issue
Genome Editing for the Understanding and Treatment of Inherited Cardiomyopathies
Previous Article in Journal
Therapeutic Effect of Iron Citrate in Blocking Calcium Deposition in High Pi-Calcified VSMC: Role of Autophagy and Apoptosis
Previous Article in Special Issue
Quantifying the Potential for Future Gene Therapy to Lower Lifetime Risk of Polygenic Late-Onset Diseases
Open AccessReview

Transplacental Gene Delivery (TPGD) as a Noninvasive Tool for Fetal Gene Manipulation in Mice

1
Division of Biomedical Engineering, National Defense Medical College Research Institute, Saitama 359-8513, Japan
2
Animal Genome Unit, Institute of Livestock and Grassland Science, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0901, Japan
3
Section of Gene Expression Regulation, Frontier Science Research Center, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(23), 5926; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20235926
Received: 9 October 2019 / Revised: 14 November 2019 / Accepted: 22 November 2019 / Published: 25 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genome Editing Therapies)
Transplacental gene delivery (TPGD) is a technique for delivering nucleic acids to fetal tissues via tail-vein injections in pregnant mice. After transplacental transport, administered nucleic acids enter fetal circulation and are distributed among fetal tissues. TPGD was established in 1995 by Tsukamoto et al., and its mechanisms, and potential applications have been further characterized since. Recently, discoveries of sequence specific nucleases, such as zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) (CRISPR/Cas9), have revolutionized genome editing. In 2019, we demonstrated that intravenous injection of plasmid DNA containing CRISPR/Cas9 produced indels in fetal myocardial cells, which are comparatively amenable to transfection with exogenous DNA. In the future, this unique technique will allow manipulation of fetal cell functions in basic studies of fetal gene therapy. In this review, we describe developments of TPGD and discuss their applications to the manipulation of fetal cells. View Full-Text
Keywords: CRISPR/Cas9; fetal gene therapy; genome editing; transplacental gene delivery (TPGD); TPGD for acquiring genome-edited fetuses (TPGD-GEF) CRISPR/Cas9; fetal gene therapy; genome editing; transplacental gene delivery (TPGD); TPGD for acquiring genome-edited fetuses (TPGD-GEF)
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Nakamura, S.; Watanabe, S.; Ando, N.; Ishihara, M.; Sato, M. Transplacental Gene Delivery (TPGD) as a Noninvasive Tool for Fetal Gene Manipulation in Mice. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 5926.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop