Next Article in Journal
Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Invasion by Ras Suppressor-1 (RSU-1) Silencing Is Reversed by Growth Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF-15)
Next Article in Special Issue
Investigating Possible Enzymatic Degradation on Polymer Shells around Inorganic Nanoparticles
Previous Article in Journal
Optimization of Sequence, Display, and Mode of Operation of IgG-Binding Peptide Ligands to Develop Robust, High-Capacity Affinity Adsorbents That Afford High IgG Product Quality
Previous Article in Special Issue
Theranostics Aspects of Various Nanoparticles in Veterinary Medicine
Open AccessHypothesis

Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials as Plant Biostimulants

1
Botánica, Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Saltillo 25315, Mexico
2
Materiales Avanzados, Centro de Investigación en Química Aplicada, Saltillo 25294, Mexico
3
Robótica y Manufactura Avanzada, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados Unidad Saltillo, Ramos Arizpe 25900, Mexico
4
CONACYT-Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Saltillo 25315, Mexico
5
Horticultura, Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Saltillo 25315, Mexico
6
Síntesis de Polímeros, Centro de Investigación en Química Aplicada, Saltillo 25294, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(1), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20010162
Received: 5 November 2018 / Revised: 21 December 2018 / Accepted: 28 December 2018 / Published: 4 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticle Protein Corona and Its Biological Applications)
Biostimulants are materials that when applied in small amounts are capable of promoting plant growth. Nanoparticles (NPs) and nanomaterials (NMs) can be considered as biostimulants since, in specific ranges of concentration, generally in small levels, they increase plant growth. Pristine NPs and NMs have a high density of surface charges capable of unspecific interactions with the surface charges of the cell walls and membranes of plant cells. In the same way, functionalized NPs and NMs, and the NPs and NMs with a corona formed after the exposition to natural fluids such as water, soil solution, or the interior of organisms, present a high density of surface charges that interact with specific charged groups in cell surfaces. The magnitude of the interaction will depend on the materials adhered to the corona, but high-density charges located in a small volume cause an intense interaction capable of disturbing the density of surface charges of cell walls and membranes. The electrostatic disturbance can have an impact on the electrical potentials of the outer and inner surfaces, as well as on the transmembrane electrical potential, modifying the activity of the integral proteins of the membranes. The extension of the cellular response can range from biostimulation to cell death and will depend on the concentration, size, and the characteristics of the corona. View Full-Text
Keywords: biostimulation; stress tolerance; elicitors; corona; hormesis; nutritional quality; growth promoters biostimulation; stress tolerance; elicitors; corona; hormesis; nutritional quality; growth promoters
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Juárez-Maldonado, A.; Ortega-Ortíz, H.; Morales-Díaz, A.B.; González-Morales, S.; Morelos-Moreno, Á.; Cabrera-De la Fuente, M.; Sandoval-Rangel, A.; Cadenas-Pliego, G.; Benavides-Mendoza, A. Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials as Plant Biostimulants. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 162.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map

1
Back to TopTop