Next Article in Journal
Antiproliferative Activity of Non-Calcemic Vitamin D Analogs on Human Melanoma Lines in Relation to VDR and PDIA3 Receptors
Next Article in Special Issue
HIC1 and RassF1A Methylation Attenuates Tubulin Expression and Cell Stiffness in Cancer
Previous Article in Journal
Bombyx mori Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase: Knockdown Inhibits Cell Growth and Proliferation via Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effects of PTEN Loss and Activated KRAS Overexpression on Mechanical Properties of Breast Epithelial Cells
Open AccessArticle

Identification of Oxidative Stress in Red Blood Cells with Nanoscale Chemical Resolution by Infrared Nanospectroscopy

1
Department of Chemistry, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB21EW, UK
2
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
3
Light Light Solutions, Athens, GA 30608, USA
4
Institute of Structural Matter, ISM-CNR, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome, Italy
5
Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Vivante, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
6
Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(9), 2582; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19092582
Received: 18 July 2018 / Revised: 23 August 2018 / Accepted: 27 August 2018 / Published: 30 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atomic Force Microscopy for Biological Applications)
During their lifespan, Red blood cells (RBC), due to their inability to self-replicate, undergo an ageing degradation phenomenon. This pathway, both in vitro and in vivo, consists of a series of chemical and morphological modifications, which include deviation from the biconcave cellular shape, oxidative stress, membrane peroxidation, lipid content decrease and uncoupling of the membrane-skeleton from the lipid bilayer. Here, we use the capabilities of atomic force microscopy based infrared nanospectroscopy (AFM-IR) to study and correlate, with nanoscale resolution, the morphological and chemical modifications that occur during the natural degradation of RBCs at the subcellular level. By using the tip of an AFM to detect the photothermal expansion of RBCs, it is possible to obtain nearly two orders of magnitude higher spatial resolution IR spectra, and absorbance images than can be obtained on diffraction-limited commercial Fourier-transform Infrared (FT-IR) microscopes. Using this approach, we demonstrate that we can identify localized sites of oxidative stress and membrane peroxidation on individual RBC, before the occurrence of neat morphological changes in the cellular shape. View Full-Text
Keywords: red blood cells; infrared nanospectroscopy; atomic force microscopy; oxidative stress; membrane peroxidation red blood cells; infrared nanospectroscopy; atomic force microscopy; oxidative stress; membrane peroxidation
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Ruggeri, F.S.; Marcott, C.; Dinarelli, S.; Longo, G.; Girasole, M.; Dietler, G.; Knowles, T.P.J. Identification of Oxidative Stress in Red Blood Cells with Nanoscale Chemical Resolution by Infrared Nanospectroscopy. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 2582.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop