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The Expensive-Tissue Hypothesis in Vertebrates: Gut Microbiota Effect, a Review

by Chun Hua Huang 1,2, Xin Yu 1,2 and Wen Bo Liao 1,2,*
1
Key Laboratory of Southwest China Wildlife Resources Conservation (Ministry of Education), China West Normal University, Nanchong 637009, Sichuan, China
2
Institute of Eco-adaptation in Amphibians and Reptiles, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637009, Sichuan, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(6), 1792; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19061792
Received: 23 April 2018 / Revised: 28 May 2018 / Accepted: 12 June 2018 / Published: 17 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The (Microbiota)–Gut–Brain Axis: Hype or Revolution?)
The gut microbiota is integral to an organism’s digestive structure and has been shown to play an important role in producing substrates for gluconeogenesis and energy production, vasodilator, and gut motility. Numerous studies have demonstrated that variation in diet types is associated with the abundance and diversity of the gut microbiota, a relationship that plays a significant role in nutrient absorption and affects gut size. The Expensive-Tissue Hypothesis states (ETH) that the metabolic requirement of relatively large brains is offset by a corresponding reduction of the other tissues, such as gut size. However, how the trade-off between gut size and brain size in vertebrates is associated with the gut microbiota through metabolic requirements still remains unexplored. Here, we review research relating to and discuss the potential influence of gut microbiota on the ETH. View Full-Text
Keywords: gut microbiota; diet; gut size; brain size; the Expensive-Tissue Hypothesis gut microbiota; diet; gut size; brain size; the Expensive-Tissue Hypothesis
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Huang, C.H.; Yu, X.; Liao, W.B. The Expensive-Tissue Hypothesis in Vertebrates: Gut Microbiota Effect, a Review. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 1792.

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