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Review

Functional Role of the C-Terminal Amphipathic Helix 8 of Olfactory Receptors and Other G Protein-Coupled Receptors

1
Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorioka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577, Japan
2
College of Life Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kathleen Van Craenenbroeck
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1930; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms17111930
Received: 28 September 2016 / Revised: 9 November 2016 / Accepted: 14 November 2016 / Published: 18 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Collection G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling and Regulation)
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce various extracellular signals, such as neurotransmitters, hormones, light, and odorous chemicals, into intracellular signals via G protein activation during neurological, cardiovascular, sensory and reproductive signaling. Common and unique features of interactions between GPCRs and specific G proteins are important for structure-based design of drugs in order to treat GPCR-related diseases. Atomic resolution structures of GPCR complexes with G proteins have revealed shared and extensive interactions between the conserved DRY motif and other residues in transmembrane domains 3 (TM3), 5 and 6, and the target G protein C-terminal region. However, the initial interactions formed between GPCRs and their specific G proteins remain unclear. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the murine olfactory receptor S6 (mOR-S6) indicated that the N-terminal acidic residue of helix 8 of mOR-S6 is responsible for initial transient and specific interactions with chimeric Gα15_olf, resulting in a response that is 2.2-fold more rapid and 1.7-fold more robust than the interaction with Gα15. Our mutagenesis analysis indicates that the hydrophobic core buried between helix 8 and TM1–2 of mOR-S6 is important for the activation of both Gα15_olf and Gα15. This review focuses on the functional role of the C-terminal amphipathic helix 8 based on several recent GPCR studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: G protein-coupled receptor; olfactory receptor; activation; interaction; Ca2+ imaging; response kinetics; homology model G protein-coupled receptor; olfactory receptor; activation; interaction; Ca2+ imaging; response kinetics; homology model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sato, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Mine, S.; Matsumura, H. Functional Role of the C-Terminal Amphipathic Helix 8 of Olfactory Receptors and Other G Protein-Coupled Receptors. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1930. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms17111930

AMA Style

Sato T, Kawasaki T, Mine S, Matsumura H. Functional Role of the C-Terminal Amphipathic Helix 8 of Olfactory Receptors and Other G Protein-Coupled Receptors. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2016; 17(11):1930. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms17111930

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sato, Takaaki, Takashi Kawasaki, Shouhei Mine, and Hiroyoshi Matsumura. 2016. "Functional Role of the C-Terminal Amphipathic Helix 8 of Olfactory Receptors and Other G Protein-Coupled Receptors" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 17, no. 11: 1930. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms17111930

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