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ω-3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Diseases: Effects, Mechanisms and Dietary Relevance

Norwegian College of Fishery Science Faculty of Biosciences, Fisheries and Economics, UIT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway
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Academic Editor: Charles Brennan
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16(9), 22636-22661; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms160922636
Received: 30 June 2015 / Revised: 1 September 2015 / Accepted: 9 September 2015 / Published: 18 September 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Health and Diseases)
ω-3 fatty acids (n-3 FA) have, since the 1970s, been associated with beneficial health effects. They are, however, prone to lipid peroxidation due to their many double bonds. Lipid peroxidation is a process that may lead to increased oxidative stress, a condition associated with adverse health effects. Recently, conflicting evidence regarding the health benefits of intake of n-3 from seafood or n-3 supplements has emerged. The aim of this review was thus to examine recent literature regarding health aspects of n-3 FA intake from fish or n-3 supplements, and to discuss possible reasons for the conflicting findings. There is a broad consensus that fish and seafood are the optimal sources of n-3 FA and consumption of approximately 2–3 servings per week is recommended. The scientific evidence of benefits from n-3 supplementation has diminished over time, probably due to a general increase in seafood consumption and better pharmacological intervention and acute treatment of patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). View Full-Text
Keywords: n-3 fatty acids; eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA); docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); lipid peroxidation; cardiovascular diseases; seafood; supplements n-3 fatty acids; eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA); docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); lipid peroxidation; cardiovascular diseases; seafood; supplements
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Maehre, H.K.; Jensen, I.-J.; Elvevoll, E.O.; Eilertsen, K.-E. ω-3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Diseases: Effects, Mechanisms and Dietary Relevance. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16, 22636-22661.

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