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The Molecular Fingerprint of High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer Reflects Its Fallopian Tube Origin

1
Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Charitéplatz 1, 11017 Berlin, Germany
2
Department of Gynecology, Charité, Campus Virchow Clinic, University Hospital Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14(4), 6571-6596; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms14046571
Received: 1 February 2013 / Revised: 11 March 2013 / Accepted: 19 March 2013 / Published: 25 March 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genes and Pathways in the Pathogenesis of Ovarian Cancer)
High grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC), the most lethal and frequent type of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), has poor long term prognosis due to a combination of factors: late detection, great metastatic potential and the capacity to develop resistance to available therapeutic drugs. Furthermore, there has been considerable controversy concerning the etiology of this malignancy. New studies, both clinical and molecular, strongly suggest that HGSC originates not from the surface of the ovary, but from the epithelial layer of the neighboring fallopian tube fimbriae. In this paper we summarize data supporting the central role of fallopian tube epithelium in the development of HGSC. Specifically, we address cellular pathways and regulatory mechanisms which are modulated in the process of transformation, but also genetic changes which accumulate during disease progression. Similarities between fallopian tube mucosa and the malignant tissue of HGSC warrant a closer analysis of homeostatic mechanisms in healthy epithelium in order to elucidate key steps in disease development. Finally, we highlight the importance of the cancer stem cell (CSC) identification and understanding of its niche regulation for improvement of therapeutic strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: serous ovarian cancer; fallopian tube; p53 signature; STIC; cellular transformation; cancer stem cells (CSC); tumor microenvironment serous ovarian cancer; fallopian tube; p53 signature; STIC; cellular transformation; cancer stem cells (CSC); tumor microenvironment
MDPI and ACS Style

Kessler, M.; Fotopoulou, C.; Meyer, T. The Molecular Fingerprint of High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer Reflects Its Fallopian Tube Origin. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14, 6571-6596.

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