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The Importance of Brain Banks for Molecular Neuropathological Research: The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre Experience

1
Schizophrenia Research Institute, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia
2
The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre, Discipline of Pathology, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2009, 10(1), 366-384; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms10010366
Received: 19 December 2008 / Revised: 14 January 2009 / Accepted: 22 January 2009 / Published: 23 January 2009
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Molecular Neuropathology)
New developments in molecular neuropathology have evoked increased demands for postmortem human brain tissue. The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre (TRC) at The University of Sydney has grown from a small tissue collection into one of the leading international brain banking facilities, which operates with best practice and quality control protocols. The focus of this tissue collection is on schizophrenia and allied disorders, alcohol use disorders and controls. This review highlights changes in TRC operational procedures dictated by modern neuroscience, and provides examples of applications of modern molecular techniques to study the neuropathogenesis of many different brain disorders. View Full-Text
Keywords: Human; brain bank; schizophrenia; alcohol; postmortem; molecular neuropathology; genome; proteome; receptor binding; clinical characterization Human; brain bank; schizophrenia; alcohol; postmortem; molecular neuropathology; genome; proteome; receptor binding; clinical characterization
MDPI and ACS Style

Dedova, I.; Harding, A.; Sheedy, D.; Garrick, T.; Sundqvist, N.; Hunt, C.; Gillies, J.; Harper, C.G. The Importance of Brain Banks for Molecular Neuropathological Research: The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre Experience. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2009, 10, 366-384.

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Int. J. Mol. Sci., EISSN 1422-0067, Published by MDPI AG
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