Next Article in Journal
A Preliminary Study of FTIR Spectroscopy as a Potential Non-Invasive Screening Tool for Pediatric Precursor B Lymphoblastic Leukemia
Previous Article in Journal
Preliminary Investigation of the Antioxidant, Anti-Diabetic, and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Enteromorpha intestinalis Extracts
Open AccessReview

Role of Gut Microbiota, Probiotics and Prebiotics in the Cardiovascular Diseases

1
Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Chodźki 4a, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
2
Department of Thermal Technology and Food Process Engineering, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Głęboka 31, 20-612 Lublin, Poland
3
Institute of Agrophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Doświadczalna 4, 20-290 Lublin, Poland
4
Department of Integrated Paediatric Dentistry, Chair of Integrated Dentistry, Medical University of Lublin, Chodźki 6, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Masahide Hamaguchi
Molecules 2021, 26(4), 1172; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26041172
Received: 12 January 2021 / Revised: 11 February 2021 / Accepted: 19 February 2021 / Published: 22 February 2021
In recent years, there has been a growing interest in identifying and applying new, naturally occurring molecules that promote health. Probiotics are defined as “live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer health benefits on the host”. Quite a few fermented products serve as the source of probiotic strains, with many factors influencing the effectiveness of probiotics, including interactions of probiotic bacteria with the host’s microbiome. Prebiotics contain no microorganisms, only substances which stimulate their growth. Prebiotics can be obtained from various sources, including breast milk, soybeans, and raw oats, however, the most popular prebiotics are the oligosaccharides contained in plants. Recent research increasingly claims that probiotics and prebiotics alleviate many disorders related to the immune system, cancer metastasis, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. However, little is known about the role of these supplements as important dietary components in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease. Still, some reports and clinical studies were conducted, offering new ways of treatment. Therefore, the aim of this review is to discuss the roles of gut microbiota, probiotics, and prebiotics interventions in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: cardiovascular disease; probiotic; prebiotic; gut microbiota; human health cardiovascular disease; probiotic; prebiotic; gut microbiota; human health
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Oniszczuk, A.; Oniszczuk, T.; Gancarz, M.; Szymańska, J. Role of Gut Microbiota, Probiotics and Prebiotics in the Cardiovascular Diseases. Molecules 2021, 26, 1172. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26041172

AMA Style

Oniszczuk A, Oniszczuk T, Gancarz M, Szymańska J. Role of Gut Microbiota, Probiotics and Prebiotics in the Cardiovascular Diseases. Molecules. 2021; 26(4):1172. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26041172

Chicago/Turabian Style

Oniszczuk, Anna; Oniszczuk, Tomasz; Gancarz, Marek; Szymańska, Jolanta. 2021. "Role of Gut Microbiota, Probiotics and Prebiotics in the Cardiovascular Diseases" Molecules 26, no. 4: 1172. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26041172

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop