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Open AccessArticle

Induced Hydrophilicity and In Vitro Preliminary Osteoblast Response of Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Coatings Obtained via MAPLE Deposition and Subsequent Thermal Treatment

1
INFLPR-National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bvd. Atomistilor, Nr. 409, Magurele (Ilfov), 077125 Bucharest, Romania
2
Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, RO-077125 Magurele, Romania
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest, 91-95 Splaiul Independentei, 050095 Bucharest, Romania
4
Department of Biology and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Horticulture, University of Craiova, Str. A.I. Cuza, Nr. 13, 200585 Craiova, Romania
5
Department of Chemical Thermodynamics, Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu”, Romanian Academy, Str. Splaiul Independentei, Nr. 202, 077125 Bucharest, Romania
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Molecules 2020, 25(3), 582; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25030582
Received: 31 December 2019 / Revised: 23 January 2020 / Accepted: 28 January 2020 / Published: 29 January 2020
Recent advancements in biomedicine have focused on designing novel and stable interfaces that can drive a specific cellular response toward the requirements of medical devices or implants. Among these, in recent years, electroactive polymers (i.e., polyvinylidene fluoride or PVDF) have caught the attention within the biomedical applications sector, due to their insolubility, stability in biological media, in vitro and in vivo non-toxicity, or even piezoelectric properties. However, the main disadvantage of PVDF-based bio-interfaces is related to the absence of the functional groups on the fluoropolymer and their hydrophobic character leading to a deficiency of cell adhesion and proliferation. This work was aimed at obtaining hydrophilic functional PVDF polymer coatings by using, for the first time, the one-step, matrix-assisted pulsed evaporation (MAPLE) method, testing the need of a post-deposition thermal treatment and analyzing their preliminary capacity to support MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cell survival. As osteoblast cells are known to prefer rough surfaces, MAPLE deposition parameters were studied for obtaining coatings with roughness of tens to hundreds of nm, while maintaining the chemical properties similar to those of the pristine material. The in vitro studies indicated that all surfaces supported the survival of viable osteoblasts with active metabolisms, similar to the “control” sample, with no major differences regarding the thermally treated materials; this eliminates the need to use a secondary step for obtaining hydrophilic PVDF coatings. The physical-chemical characteristics of the thin films, along with the in vitro analyses, suggest that MAPLE is an adequate technique for fabricating PVDF thin films for further bio-applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: PVDF; MAPLE; coatings; induced-hydrophilicity; polymeric biointerface; thermal treatment PVDF; MAPLE; coatings; induced-hydrophilicity; polymeric biointerface; thermal treatment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dumitrescu, L.N.; Neacsu, P.; Necula, M.G.; Bonciu, A.; Marascu, V.; Cimpean, A.; Moldovan, A.; Rotaru, A.; Dinca, V.; Dinescu, M. Induced Hydrophilicity and In Vitro Preliminary Osteoblast Response of Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Coatings Obtained via MAPLE Deposition and Subsequent Thermal Treatment. Molecules 2020, 25, 582. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25030582

AMA Style

Dumitrescu LN, Neacsu P, Necula MG, Bonciu A, Marascu V, Cimpean A, Moldovan A, Rotaru A, Dinca V, Dinescu M. Induced Hydrophilicity and In Vitro Preliminary Osteoblast Response of Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Coatings Obtained via MAPLE Deposition and Subsequent Thermal Treatment. Molecules. 2020; 25(3):582. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25030582

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dumitrescu, Luminita N.; Neacsu, Patricia; Necula, Madalina G.; Bonciu, Anca; Marascu, Valentina; Cimpean, Anisoara; Moldovan, Antoniu; Rotaru, Andrei; Dinca, Valentina; Dinescu, Maria. 2020. "Induced Hydrophilicity and In Vitro Preliminary Osteoblast Response of Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Coatings Obtained via MAPLE Deposition and Subsequent Thermal Treatment" Molecules 25, no. 3: 582. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25030582

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