Next Article in Journal
Protective Effects of a New C-Jun N-terminal Kinase Inhibitor in the Model of Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rats
Next Article in Special Issue
Associated Effects of Cadmium and Copper Alter the Heavy Metals Uptake by Melissa Officinalis
Previous Article in Journal
QM/MM Benchmarking of Cyanobacteriochrome Slr1393g3 Absorption Spectra
Previous Article in Special Issue
Serum iron, Magnesium, Copper, and Manganese Levels in Alcoholism: A Systematic Review
Open AccessArticle

Increased Aluminum Content in Certain Brain Structures is Correlated with Higher Silicon Concentration in Alcoholic Use Disorder

1
Department of Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, Jaczewskiego 4, 20-090 Lublin, Poland
2
Department of Neurosurgery and Pediatric Neurosurgery, Medical University of Lublin, Jaczewskiego 8, 20-954 Lublin, Poland
3
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Chodźki 4a, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
4
Department of Clinical Genetics, Medical University of Lublin, Radziwiłłowska 11, 20-080 Lublin, Poland
5
Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, 89B Umultowska Street, 61-614 Poznan, Poland
6
Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Lublin, 8b Jaczewskiego St, 20-090 Lublin, Poland
7
Department of Environmental Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 61-701 Poznan, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Francesco Crea and Alberto Pettignano
Molecules 2019, 24(9), 1721; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24091721
Received: 8 April 2019 / Revised: 24 April 2019 / Accepted: 1 May 2019 / Published: 3 May 2019
Introduction: Alcohol overuse may be related to increased aluminum (Al) exposure, the brain accumulation of which contributes to dementia. However, some reports indicate that silicon (Si) may have a protective role over Al-induced toxicity. Still, no study has ever explored the brain content of Al and Si in alcoholic use disorder (AUD). Materials and methods: To fill this gap, the present study employed inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry to investigate levels of Al and Si in 10 brain regions and in the liver of AUD patients (n = 31) and control (n = 32) post-mortem. Results: Al content was detected only in AUD patients at mean ± SD total brain content of 1.59 ± 1.19 mg/kg, with the highest levels in the thalamus (4.05 ± 12.7 mg/kg, FTH), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (3.48 ± 9.67 mg/kg, ILF), insula (2.41 ± 4.10 mg/kg) and superior longitudinal fasciculus (1.08 ± 2.30 mg/kg). Si content displayed no difference between AUD and control, except for FTH. Positive inter-region correlations between the content of both elements were identified in the cingulate cortex, hippocampus, and ILF. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that AUD patients may potentially be prone to Al-induced neurodegeneration in their brain—although this hypothesis requires further exploration. View Full-Text
Keywords: aluminum; silicon; ICP-OES; trace elements; brain trace element concentration; brain toxicity aluminum; silicon; ICP-OES; trace elements; brain trace element concentration; brain toxicity
MDPI and ACS Style

Grochowski, C.; Blicharska, E.; Bogucki, J.; Proch, J.; Mierzwińska, A.; Baj, J.; Litak, J.; Podkowiński, A.; Flieger, J.; Teresiński, G.; Maciejewski, R.; Niedzielski, P.; Rzymski, P. Increased Aluminum Content in Certain Brain Structures is Correlated with Higher Silicon Concentration in Alcoholic Use Disorder. Molecules 2019, 24, 1721.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop