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NOx-, IL-1β-, TNF-α-, and IL-6-Inhibiting Effects and Trypanocidal Activity of Banana (Musa acuminata) Bracts and Flowers: UPLC-HRESI-MS Detection of Phenylpropanoid Sucrose Esters

1
Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, Brazil
2
Department of Clinical Analysis, Centre of Health Sciences, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88 040 970 Florianópolis, Brazil
3
Laboratory of Protozoology, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology Centre of biological sciences, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, Brazil
4
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Centre of Health Sciences, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, Brazil
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Toshio Morikawa
Molecules 2019, 24(24), 4564; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24244564
Received: 14 November 2019 / Revised: 4 December 2019 / Accepted: 9 December 2019 / Published: 13 December 2019
Banana inflorescences are a byproduct of banana cultivation consumed in various regions of Brazil as a non-conventional food. This byproduct represents an alternative food supply that can contribute to the resolution of nutritional problems and hunger. This product is also used in Asia as a traditional remedy for the treatment of various illnesses such as bronchitis and dysentery. However, there is a lack of chemical and pharmacological data to support its consumption as a functional food. Therefore, this work aimed to study the anti-inflammatory action of Musa acuminata blossom by quantifying the cytokine levels (NOx, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6) in peritoneal neutrophils, and to study its antiparasitic activities using the intracellular forms of T. cruzi, L. amazonensis, and L. infantum. This work also aimed to establish the chemical profile of the inflorescence using UPLC-ESI-MS analysis. Flowers and the crude bract extracts were partitioned in dichloromethane and n-butanol to afford four fractions (FDCM, FNBU, BDCM, and BNBU). FDCM showed moderate trypanocidal activity and promising anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6. BDCM significantly inhibited the secretion of TNF-α, while BNBU was active against IL-6 and NOx. LCMS data of these fractions revealed an unprecedented presence of arylpropanoid sucroses alongside flavonoids, triterpenes, benzofurans, stilbenes, and iridoids. The obtained results revealed that banana inflorescences could be used as an anti-inflammatory food ingredient to control inflammatory diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: banana inflorescences; anti-inflammatory activity; antiparasitic activity; UPLC-ESI-MS; arylpropanoid sucroses banana inflorescences; anti-inflammatory activity; antiparasitic activity; UPLC-ESI-MS; arylpropanoid sucroses
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Sandjo, L.P.; dos Santos Nascimento, M.V.P.; de H. Moraes, M.; Rodrigues, L.M.; Dalmarco, E.M.; Biavatti, M.W.; Steindel, M. NOx-, IL-1β-, TNF-α-, and IL-6-Inhibiting Effects and Trypanocidal Activity of Banana (Musa acuminata) Bracts and Flowers: UPLC-HRESI-MS Detection of Phenylpropanoid Sucrose Esters. Molecules 2019, 24, 4564.

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