Next Article in Journal
Simultaneous Determination of Etomidate and Its Major Metabolite, Etomidate Acid, in Urine Using Dilute and Shoot Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Previous Article in Journal
Phytochemical Fingerprinting and In Vitro Bioassays of the Ethnomedicinal Fern Tectaria coadunata (J. Smith) C. Christensen from Central Nepal
Previous Article in Special Issue
Nanostructured and Photochromic Material for Environmental Detection of Metal Ions
Open AccessReview

Potential Risk to Pollinators from Nanotechnology-Based Pesticides

1
Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University, 4017 Agriculture and Life Science Building, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
2
Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, 4017 Agriculture and Life Science Building, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
3
School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, 116 Johnson Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Frank Alexis
Molecules 2019, 24(24), 4458; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24244458
Received: 31 October 2019 / Revised: 24 November 2019 / Accepted: 2 December 2019 / Published: 5 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Nanotechnology)
The decline in populations of insect pollinators is a global concern. While multiple factors are implicated, there is uncertainty surrounding the contribution of certain groups of pesticides to losses in wild and managed bees. Nanotechnology-based pesticides (NBPs) are formulations based on multiple particle sizes and types. By packaging active ingredients in engineered particles, NBPs offer many benefits and novel functions, but may also exhibit different properties in the environment when compared with older pesticide formulations. These new properties raise questions about the environmental disposition and fate of NBPs and their exposure to pollinators. Pollinators such as honey bees have evolved structural adaptations to collect pollen, but also inadvertently gather other types of environmental particles which may accumulate in hive materials. Knowledge of the interaction between pollinators, NBPs, and other types of particles is needed to better understand their exposure to pesticides, and essential for characterizing risk from diverse environmental contaminants. The present review discusses the properties, benefits and types of nanotechnology-based pesticides, the propensity of bees to collect such particles and potential impacts on bee pollinators. View Full-Text
Keywords: Nanotechnology-based particles; Pesticides; Bees; Pollinators; Environmental pollution; Exposure potential; Particulate matter Nanotechnology-based particles; Pesticides; Bees; Pollinators; Environmental pollution; Exposure potential; Particulate matter
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hooven, L.A.; Chakrabarti, P.; Harper, B.J.; Sagili, R.R.; Harper, S.L. Potential Risk to Pollinators from Nanotechnology-Based Pesticides. Molecules 2019, 24, 4458.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop