Next Article in Journal
The Power of LC-MS Based Multiomics: Exploring Adipogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells
Previous Article in Journal
Antidiabetic and Cosmeceutical Potential of Common Barbery (Berberis vulgaris L.) Root Bark Extracts Obtained by Optimization of ‘Green’ Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction
Previous Article in Special Issue
Steam Explosion Conditions Highly Influence the Biogas Yield of Rice Straw
Open AccessArticle

Matrix Discriminant Analysis Evidenced Surface-Lithium as an Important Factor to Increase the Hydrolytic Saccharification of Sugarcane Bagasse

1
Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo. Bandeirantes Av., 3900, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil
2
Departamento de Biologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo. Bandeirantes Av., 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil
3
Departamento de Biologia, Instituto de Biociências Letras e Ciências Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho. Cristovão Colombo Street, 2265, 15054000 São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo, Brazil
4
Laboratório de Fisiologia Ecológica (LAFIECO), Departamento de Botânica, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo. Matão Street, 277, Cidade Universitária, 05508-090 São Paulo, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Molecules 2019, 24(19), 3614; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24193614
Received: 15 August 2019 / Revised: 10 September 2019 / Accepted: 20 September 2019 / Published: 8 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficient Technology for the Pretreatment of Biomass II)
Statistical evidence pointing to the very soft change in the ionic composition on the surface of the sugar cane bagasse is crucial to improve yields of sugars by hydrolytic saccharification. Removal of Li+ by pretreatments exposing -OH sites was the most important factor related to the increase of saccharification yields using enzyme cocktails. Steam Explosion and Microwave:H2SO4 pretreatments produced unrelated structural changes, but similar ionic distribution patterns. Both increased the saccharification yield 1.74-fold. NaOH produced structural changes related to Steam Explosion, but released surface-bounded Li+ obtaining 2.04-fold more reducing sugars than the control. In turn, the higher amounts in relative concentration and periodic structures of Li+ on the surface observed in the control or after the pretreatment with Ethanol:DMSO:Ammonium Oxalate, blocked -OH and O available for ionic sputtering. These changes correlated to 1.90-fold decrease in saccharification yields. Li+ was an activator in solution, but its presence and distribution pattern on the substrate was prejudicial to the saccharification. Apparently, it acts as a phase-dependent modulator of enzyme activity. Therefore, no correlations were found between structural changes and the efficiency of the enzymatic cocktail used. However, there were correlations between the Li+ distribution patterns and the enzymatic activities that should to be shown. View Full-Text
Keywords: lithium; sugarcane bagasse; saccharification; glycosyl-hydrolase; ToF-SIMS; surface ion distribution; second-generation ethanol; pretreatment lithium; sugarcane bagasse; saccharification; glycosyl-hydrolase; ToF-SIMS; surface ion distribution; second-generation ethanol; pretreatment
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

de Almeida Scarcella, A.S.; Somera, A.F.; da Costa Carreira Nunes, C.; Gomes, E.; Vici, A.C.; Buckeridge, M.S.; de Moraes Polizeli, M.L.T. Matrix Discriminant Analysis Evidenced Surface-Lithium as an Important Factor to Increase the Hydrolytic Saccharification of Sugarcane Bagasse. Molecules 2019, 24, 3614.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop