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Open AccessArticle

Growth Biocontrol of Foodborne Pathogens and Spoilage Microorganisms of Food by Polish Propolis Extracts

1
Division of Food Biotechnology and Microbiology, Department of Biotechnology, Microbiology and Food Evaluation, Faculty of Food Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159c, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
2
Laboratory of New Herbal Products, Department of Vegetable and Medicinal Plants, Faculty of Horticulture, Biotechnology and Landscape Architecture, Warsaw University of Life Sciences SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159c, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
3
Department of Food Engineering and Process Management, Faculty of Food Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159c, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Lars P. Christensen
Molecules 2019, 24(16), 2965; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24162965
Received: 18 July 2019 / Revised: 13 August 2019 / Accepted: 14 August 2019 / Published: 15 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Properties of Natural Products)
Propolis is a natural mixture produced by bees from plant resin substances. This study focuses on the general characteristics of five samples of Polish extract propolis originating from agricultural areas. Chemical composition with high performance liquid chromatography‒diode array detector method, total content of flavonoids and polyphenols, and antioxidative activity were determined in the ethanol extracts of propolis (EEP) samples. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration (MBC/MFC) and time-kill curves were studied for foodborne pathogens and food spoilage microorganisms. In EEPs the predominant flavonoid compounds were pinocembrin, chrysin, pinobanksin, apigenin, and kaempferol and the predominant phenolic acids were p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and caffeic acid. A strong antioxidative action of propolis in vitro was observed (IC50 for DPPH radical was at the level of 0.9–2.1 µg/mL). EEPs had MIC values for bacteria in the range of 1–16 mg/mL, whereas MIC for fungi ranged from 2 to 32 mg/mL. Extract of propolis originating from southern Poland was distinguished by higher content of bioactive components, and stronger antioxidative and antimicrobial activity than EPPs from the remaining areas of Poland. The results indicate the possibility of applying ethanol extracts from Polish propolis to protect food against microbiological spoilage. View Full-Text
Keywords: propolis; antimicrobial activity; antioxidant activity; time-kill; bacteria; yeast; mold propolis; antimicrobial activity; antioxidant activity; time-kill; bacteria; yeast; mold
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Pobiega, K.; Kraśniewska, K.; Przybył, J.L.; Bączek, K.; Żubernik, J.; Witrowa-Rajchert, D.; Gniewosz, M. Growth Biocontrol of Foodborne Pathogens and Spoilage Microorganisms of Food by Polish Propolis Extracts. Molecules 2019, 24, 2965.

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